Phyllis Schlafly
When Barack Obama promised to "fundamentally transform the United States" we could not have anticipated the extreme transformations he would seek. The evidence is rolling in that he is determined to transform America into a totally secular land where religion is permitted only within the walls of a church and is banned in every public place, public gathering and public school.

Obama tipped us off to his animosity toward religious Americans when, campaigning in San Francisco in 2008, he insulted religious people in small towns. He said, they "get bitter, they cling to guns or religion or antipathy to people who aren't like them or anti-immigrant sentiment or anti-trade sentiment as a way to explain their frustrations."

In April 2009, Obama delivered a speech at Georgetown University, only after his staff had pressured the Catholic college to conceal the monogram for the name of Jesus that was always displayed above the podium. In May 2009, he cancelled the traditional White House event honoring the National Day of Prayer, saying that he would pray only in private.

Obama began censoring religious words out of important American documents, such as the Declaration of Independence, from which he many times deleted the word "Creator." In a November 2010, speech, Obama pretended to quote the U.S. national motto, "In God We Trust," but he changed it to "e pluribus unum" (out of many, one).

When Obama gave the traditional Presidential Thanksgiving Day address in 2011, it's not clear whom he was thanking on this uniquely American holiday, but it was not God.

Barack Obama is trying to morph our traditional religious liberty to the lesser scope of freedom of worship. That means worship only inside a church, or maybe a synagogue, but not any public affirmation of belief in God.

In July 2011, Obama's Department of Veterans Affairs banned any mention of Jesus Christ during burials at Houston National Cemetery. The ban was lifted only after hundreds of demonstrators protested.

In September 2011, the U.S. Army revised guidelines for Walter Reed Hospital to read: "No religious items (i.e., Bibles, reading materials...) are allowed to be given away or used during a visit." The hospital rescinded this policy only after Congressman Steve King, R-Iowa, reported it to the House of Representatives.

In February 2012, the Air Force removed the Latin word for God, Dei, from the logo of the Rapid Capabilities Office, and it was also removed the Latin motto, which means "Doing God's Work With Other People's Money." The new logo says, "Doing Miracles with Other People's Money."


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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