Harry R. Jackson, Jr.

Editors' note: This column contains graphic description of surgical mutilation.

For many years, Africans and immigrants from the Middle East have secretly remained faithful to cultural rituals and rights of passage that have been designed to keep their young women chaste and eligible for marriage. Partial or total female circumcision is one of these practices. In an alarming reversal of protocol and wisdom, this dehumanizing practice is gaining acceptance within the US these days. In fact the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has recommended that American doctors be given permission to perform “ceremonial” female circumcisions.

Once again American leaders are fearfully overcompensating for cultural and religious practices from other lands. America especially seems to be intimidated by rituals found in Islam. There are some cities in the nation that even desire to allow Sharia law to operate in the United States. In that spirit of accommodation, the AAP wants to give pinpricks or to “nick” the genitals of young girls here in the US whose families come from cultures that mandate female circumcisions. The doctors’ rationale is that if they perform the lesser procedure here in the States, it would keep their families from sending the girls overseas for full circumcisions.

Michelle Malkin

Before I go further, let me explain exactly what female circumcision is. The biological reason behind this practice is to reduce a girl’s sexual desire. Many cultures and religious groups are convinced that this practice will ensure a young woman’s virginity until marriage. Removal of all or part of the clitoris is the essence of the female circumcision. The more extensive procedure could also involve stitching the vagina. Reducing the size of the vagina is also intended to increase the future husband's enjoyment of the sexual act.

Although the current law “makes criminal any non-medical procedure performed on the genitals” of a girl in the United States, the APA believes that US residents will be discouraged from returning to their homelands for the cruel surgeries often administered by midwives or female village elders.


Harry R. Jackson, Jr.

Bishop Harry Jackson is chairman of the High Impact Leadership Coalition and senior pastor of Hope Christian Church in Beltsville, MD, and co-authored, Personal Faith, Public Policy [FrontLine; March 2008] with Tony Perkins, president of the Family Research Council.