David Stokes

Sometime after the transition in January of 1969, President Richard Nixon asked his predecessor, Lyndon Johnson, how it felt the moment he knew he wasn’t president anymore.  LBJ replied:

“I don’t know whether you’ll understand this now or not, but you certainly will later.  I sat there on that platform and waited for you to stand up and raise your right hand and take the oath of office, and the most pleasant words that I ever – that ever came to my ears were ‘So help me God’ that you repeated after that oath.  Because at that time I no longer had the fear that I was the man that could make the mistake of involving the country in war, that I was no longer the man that would have to carry the terrifying responsibility of protecting the lives of this country and maybe the entire world, unleashing the horrors of some of our great power if I felt that was required.”

As the nation watches the high and historic drama unfold on January 20th, all eyes will be on Barack Obama and his beautiful family.  While he assumes the awesome responsibilities that come with being America’s 44th president, there will be another – much quieter – drama unfolding. 

George W. Bush will fade into the political sunset and take his first steps as a former leader of the free world.  And as he takes a final lap during these waning moments of his administration, complete with exit interviews, a press conference, and address to the nation, he has the look of someone who is very much looking forward to some of what Lyndon Johnson was talking about.

Harry Truman remarked at the moment he inherited the presidency that he felt as if a “load of hay” had fallen on him.  Well, hay or whatever, the day he left office he felt relief.  As he sat on the platform listening to Dwight D. Eisenhower deliver his inaugural address, Truman found his mind wandering.  A short while later, he was in a limousine for a ride to a farewell luncheon.  Suddenly, the driver stopped for a red light – the first such traffic observance for Truman since April of 1945. 

Those first hours as a former president must be interesting indeed.


David Stokes

David R. Stokes is a best-selling author, pastor, columnist, and broadcaster. His latest book is a novel: CAPITOL LIMITED: A Story about John Kennedy and Richard Nixon. Based on a true story, it's about a unique moment in 1947, when Kennedy and Nixon shared