Byron York

In early March 1991, all the smart people in politics knew one thing about the upcoming 1992 campaign: President George H.W. Bush was unbeatable.

Fresh from victory in the Gulf War, Bush enjoyed a job-approval rating around 90 percent. At a time when potential challengers should be enlisting supporters and planning campaigns, Democrats who had been expected to challenge Bush held back, hesitant to enter a race that seemed hopeless. "Will anybody run against George Bush in 1992?" asked Juan Williams in the Washington Post on March 10, 1991. "There are no candidate footprints in the pristine snows of New Hampshire this winter, and the Iowa cornfields are untrampled."

March passed, and then April, May, June and July, and still Democrats searched for candidates willing to challenge Bush. One by one, the big names -- Al Gore, Dick Gephardt, Mario Cuomo -- decided not to run. Bush was just too strong.

The Democratic field that finally emerged seemed decidedly lackluster: Jerry Brown, Paul Tsongas, Bob Kerrey, Bill Clinton, Douglas Wilder and Tom Harkin. After an undistinguished primary season, one of them would be the sacrificial lamb to run against Bush.

Today, 20 years later, there's no need to elaborate on how it turned out. All you have to say is that the prize went to the candidate who took a risk when others shied away.

Now we're in a political season in which it is Republicans who seem hesitant to challenge an incumbent president. And we're seeing the emergence of a new conventional wisdom: Barack Obama will be very tough to beat.

What a change. Back in 1991, the pundits discussed how hard it would be to defeat a president with a job-approval rating of 90 percent. Now, they're talking about how hard it would be to defeat a president with a job-approval rating of 47 percent.

Back in the first Bush administration, some GOP strategists surveyed the struggling Democratic field and repeated the old axiom: "You can't beat somebody with nobody." Who could possibly have the stature to knock off President George H.W. Bush? Now, some of those same Republicans are fretting about the quality of their own presidential field and repeating the same slogan, this time not in overconfidence but in self-reproach. Maybe they've forgotten 1991.

Byron York

Byron York, chief political correspondent for The Washington Examiner