Armstrong Williams

I've read (and maybe even said) some incendiary things through the years that were designed to elicit a response or stoke the ire of readers in order to initiate a frank conversation. But a recent piece by national columnist Kevin Blackistone makes even the seasoned political watcher cringe.

In his recent missive entitled, "Time to Turn Off the National Anthem Before Sports Events," Mr. Blackistone argues that the singing of the National Anthem at sporting events has outlived its purpose. He submits that very few Americans even know the song, and suggests that still fewer can recall why the words were written in the first place. There's nothing about playing T-ball that should hearken memories of a lopsided British attack on Fort McHenry during the War of 1812.

"Sports," Mr. Blackistone writes, "have and continue to ritualize [the Anthem] with barely a shred of relevance."

Singing a song about soldiers raising a flag following hours of cannon bombardment may have little to do with the indoor soccer game parents are watching, but that same song does remind everyone at that game that they stand there because of American sacrifice.

Blood was shed so that we might be free. When we say that soldiers "will never be forgotten," shouldn't we mean it? We honor and commemorate their lives and the sacrifices they made for us by remembering them. That's why we sing the National Anthem at sporting events. We don't do it because there's some underlying connection between the American Revolution and sports, but because sports bring us together to enjoy something as a group. It unites us beyond our cultural and political differences. The stockbroker sits next to the dockworker, and both are united by their devotion to the local team. Isn't that the perfect time to celebrate the nation that embodies that very idea?

Yes, pop icon Christina Aguilera flubbed the anthem on America's grandest sports stage, but to use that episode to argue that the lyrics and meaning of the song have gone the way of 8-track tapes is ludicrous.

Many can't recite even the preamble to the Constitution. Still fewer can tell you on what day the Declaration of Independence was signed, let alone who actually declared independence and from what oppressive land. Would Mr. Blackistone suggest we toss such documents into the trash? Or not have them hanging in our institutions of government simply because the magistrate can't recall their every word?


Armstrong Williams

Armstrong Williams is a widely-syndicated columnist, CEO of the Graham Williams Group, and hosts the Armstrong Williams Show. He is the author of Reawakening Virtues.
 
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