Kevin Glass
Texas Gov. Rick Perry, amidst 2012 contention rumors, appeared at a predominantly Hispanic anti-abortion rally in Los Angeles with some choice words for President Obama.

"Every life is precious," Perry said, as his remarks were repeated by a translator in Spanish. He said the direction of stem cell research under the Obama administration was "turning the remains of unborn children into nothing more than raw material."

The Obama administration is ignoring "the overriding responsibility of every government - that is to protect citizens at every stage of their lives, especially those who cannot protect themselves," Perry said.

Despite his spokesman claiming "this is not a political event," taking the stage in a state where you are not governor for a rally in which you assail the sitting President seems like a move towards a campaign.

Campaign insiders claim that a potential late entry into the race shouldn't hurt a candidate when it comes to fundraisers. Moreover, some of the big George W. Bush donors seem to be coalescing around the Texas Governor.

[A] special session that started last month, forced by a Democratic filibuster over funding for public education, could keep Mr. Perry cooped up at the Texas Capitol through June 29.

But Sig Rogich, one of Mr. Bush's “Rangers” who collected more than $200,000 for his campaigns, argued that Mr. Perry’s work in Austin shouldn’t be seen as a disadvantage if Mr. Perry decided to get in the race.

“Maybe today - more than I’ve seen in recent memory - coming from the back of the pack might be a real advantage,” Mr. Rogich said.

With what some consider to be gaping holes in the GOP field, an entrance by Governor Perry into the race could be a game-changer.

Kevin Glass

Kevin Glass is Director of Policy and Outreach at the Franklin Center for Government and Public Integrity