Suzanne Fields
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If the teachers unions would use their collective bargaining rights to do good for their students rather than doing well for themselves, they could make a stronger case for themselves. The good teachers, if they provide a little evidence, might even make a credible argument for getting paid more money.

But nooooooo. They're talking "me, me, me."

Unions were originally formed as a protection against exploitive employers, but teachers unions are often trying to exploit their employers -- the taxpayers -- even though most of us aren't happy with what we're paying for. The problem has many causes, but negotiating for ever-bigger salaries and more expensive pensions won't resolve any problems.

Fortunately, we're beginning to discover what any kid taught by the old-maid school teacher of unkind stereotype knew in the decades between the Little Red School House and the vast public school system: Learning is largely determined by the quality of the teaching.

Feminism accomplished many good things, opening opportunities for careers for women (married and single), but that meant that many smart, ambitious women became lawyers, doctors, accountants and scientists. They shunned teaching.

That's not to say there aren't lots of smart, ambitious teachers today. There are. But they're not created by graduate schools devoted to Mickey Mouse educationist theory. Nor are the high scorers on the SAT tests usually drawn to teaching. In the 1960s, 25 percent of new female teachers graduated in the top 10 percent of their classes. Three decades later, the number of new teachers at the top of their classes had declined to only 10 percent. What we teach teachers usually determines who wants to be a teacher.

Unlike other professions, where experience and longevity generally means more knowledge gained and consequently a better "product," seniority in teaching has little or no effect on student performance.

"The United States spends $50 billion a year on automatic salary increases based on teacher seniority," writes Bill Gates in The Washington Post. "It's reasonable to suppose that teachers who have served longer are more effective, but the evidence says that is not true."

Only a government-funded institution would allow such profligacy. Nor do advanced degrees or smaller classes make a positive difference.

What is true is that excellent teaching begets excellent students. To that end, the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation will study teachers whose students show performance gains to see whether there's a way to quantify what makes a great (or even good) teacher.

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Suzanne Fields

Suzanne Fields is currently working on a book that will revisit John Milton's 'Paradise Lost.'

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