Suzanne Fields
"Homegrown" promises something fresh and tasty when applied to tomatoes, cabbage and beans straight from the farmer's field. But about terrorism, not so much. Homegrown terrorists, recruited from the newly arrived from the Muslim countries of the Middle East and Africa, are the latest menace to America. They're new transplants to these shores and sometimes even the native born.

Mohamed Osman Mohamud, 19, a Somalia-born U.S. citizen, planned to detonate a van loaded with explosives in Pioneer Courthouse Square in Portland, Ore., during a crowded Christmas tree lighting, sabotaging a joyous celebration of the Christmas season. Fortunately, he only knew how to make a fake bomb because his tutors were FBI agents working undercover.

Two months earlier, Faroque Ahmed, a Pakistan-born U.S. citizen, was arrested in Washington for plotting to blow up the Metro trains. In May, Faisal Shazad, a naturalized U.S. citizen born in Pakistan, tried but failed to explode a car bomb in New York's Times Square. He was convicted and sentenced to life in prison.

The foiling of these plots before they caused harm are triumphs of intelligence, diligence and increased awareness of the enemy in our midst. But for all of our success, the terrorists have a sly and insidious strategy -- a strategy detailed in three English-language editions of a jihadist propaganda magazine called Inspire.

"The latest edition of Inspire is not very inspiring," says Rep. Pete Hoekstra of Michigan, the top Republican on the House Intelligence Committee. "The call for lunch-counter attacks in Washington, D.C., is alarming, but consistent with the type of smaller-scale terrorist attacks that al-Qaida and its affiliates are seemingly focused on these days."

Inspire may not be inspiring, but it's slick and glossy and appeals to the young who pursue the thrill of dealing violent death to the despised infidels in the West.

Some of the tips seem aimed at the slow-witted: "If your opponent covers his right cheek, slap him on the left." Others are more sophisticated and more violent: An illustrated tutorial shows how a Ford F-150 pickup truck can become the "Ultimate Mowing Machine" and inflict "maximum carnage" with the addition of steel blades to the front grille and driven at high speed into a crowd of pedestrians. There are descriptions of how to wrap packages to foil metal detectors and sniffer dogs.

The magazine mixes the sensibility of violent electronic games and real-life seriousness to describe grisly ideas for creating death and chaos, invoking the instructions and blessings of Allah: "We will cast terror into the hearts of those who disbelieve."


Suzanne Fields

Suzanne Fields is currently working on a book that will revisit John Milton's 'Paradise Lost.'

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