Robert Knight

Hillary Clinton thinks it’s a “hard choice” to take a human life.

She wasn’t talking about soldiers facing combat, or what police do in showdowns with criminals. Or even what an armed homeowner might ponder for a split second during a break-in.

The former First Lady and former Secretary of State was talking about aborting unborn children, which she regards as merely a “choice,” albeit a “hard” one.

And why is it hard, if the baby is not – against all scientific evidence – a human being?

If the child is not a child, just protoplasm that just happens to be in a mother’s womb, what’s the big deal?

Hillary Clinton has had her thumb on the scale of death for unborn children so long that she probably cannot fathom how absurd her stance is. And given her keenly honed political instincts, which take into account the short attention span of the average American voter, she might well ask, “what, at this point, difference does it make?”

Right after the U.S. Supreme Court recovered a tiny bit of our decaying religious freedom last Monday by ruling that the Christian-owned Hobby Lobby craft store chain does not have to pay for abortion drugs for its employees, Clinton waxed grimly poetic at the uber-trendy Aspen Ideas Festival, where she pushed her memoir, “Hard Choices.”

As Gary Bauer has noted, Mrs. Clinton “managed to compare free contraception to honor killings and genital mutilation. Asked about the court's Hobby Lobby ruling, Clinton said:

‘It is a disturbing trend that you see in a lot of societies that are unstable, anti-democratic and, frankly, prone to extremism, where women's bodies are used as the defining and unifying issue to bring together people -- men -- to get them to behave in ways that are disadvantageous to women but prop up rulers.’”

“This is a really bad slippery slope,” she also told interviewer Walter Isaacson, who presumably knows bad slippery slopes from good ones. Skiers pay a small fortune to traverse the latter when God endows Aspen with snow.

“It’s the first time that our court has said that a closely-held corporation has the rights of a person when it comes to religious freedom, which means that the … corporation's employers can impose their religious beliefs on their employees," Mrs. Clinton continued.


Robert Knight

Robert Knight is an author, senior fellow for the American Civil Rights Union and a frequent contributor to Townhall.