Rich Galen
The professional political class (of which I am a dues-paying member) has made it clear that they believe Barack Obama is a world-class campaigner and Mitt Romney steps on his tongue with some regularity.

I have bought into this theory if only because (a) I think a sitting President deserves the benefit of the doubt, and (b) I think that Obamas biggest critics are, at a minimum, a little nutty.

have changed my mind. And this might put me into the "a little nutty" column, but I no longer care.

Last month Barack Obama said, "The private sector is doing fine." Lest you think I am quoting out of context, here's what he said via the Huffington Post, not a right wing mouthpiece:

"We've created 4.3 million jobs over the past 27 months. The private sector is doing fine. Where we're seeing weaknesses in our economy have to do with state and local government, oftentimes cuts initiated by, you know, governors or mayors who are not getting the kind of help that they have in the past from the federal government and who don't have the same kind of flexibility of the federal government in dealing with fewer revenues coming in."

The federal government, states the Gospel According to Obama, is the court of last resort for governors and mayors no matter how bloated the public payrolls and public pensions, nor how inefficient the delivery of services.

All right. Everyone gets to make one boneheaded statement. Lord knows I've used up several lifetimes of "Get Out of Jail Free" cards for idiotic things I've said in the heat of battle on TV.

But, then Obama said the other day that people who have started and built businesses are claiming credit for something they shouldn't. Obama said, in part:

"If you've got a business, you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen."

What?

Barack Obama has never - within our sketchy knowledge of his background - had to put his personal money at risk to create anything nor to hire anyone.

When Obama is talking about building a business he has no idea what he's talking about, because he's never done it.

After my speech with Mullfave Donna Brazile in Cleveland earlier this week I drove down to the home territories of Marietta, Ohio 45750 to have dinner with one set of friends and breakfast the next morning with another.

Both sets are small business people. They create jobs, they worry over payrolls, they are constantly looking for new clients, and their personal checking accounts are always on the table.

Rich Galen

Rich Galen has been a press secretary to Dan Quayle and Newt Gingrich. Rich Galen currently works as a journalist and writes at Mullings.com.