Rachel Alexander

Politicians today are getting away with higher levels of disgraceful behavior. Even just a few years ago it was a shock when a high-level political official did something immoral or promoted inappropriate values. When former Surgeon General Jocelyn Elders said in 1994 that masturbation should be promoted to deter young people from engaging in risky sex, President Clinton fired her. Clinton himself was impeached by the House of Representatives in 1998 for perjury relating to his extramarital liaison with Monica Lewinsky and sexual harassment of Paula Jones.

Now, the media scarcely covers most politicians’ shameful behavior. Inappropriate acts by high-level Democrats have mostly been ignored during the Obama administration. Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arranged last month for Lady Gaga, a pop singer known for her shocking behavior and skimpy outfits, to sing at a Europride gay, lesbian and transgender festival in Rome. Gaga’s disgraceful acts include pretending to be stabbed to death during concert performances and falling on the floor in a pool of blood. Clinton’s efforts promoting someone that offensive in order to enable them to appear at a controversial festival received almost no scrutiny. No one even questioned why the State Department was inserting itself into the business of questionable pop stars.

In May, First Lady Michelle Obama invited rapper “Common” to the White House to perform at a poetry night. Common has called for the burning of George W. Bush and praises a Black Panther cop killer in his song lyrics. Michelle Obama honored singer Beyonce at the 2011 Billboard Awards and also thanked her for being a “role model” for her girls. Beyonce is known for wearing practically next to nothing and singing songs like “Naughty Girl,” about desiring a one night stand.

Contrast these music artists with those invited to the White House by prior presidential administrations; Nancy Reagan invited the Beach Boys to the White House and President Nixon invited Elvis. With all the talent in America, it would have been easy to find someone more deserving who would stand up to public scrutiny as an appropriate role model. Rock stars may not be role models, but the President and his wife certainly are looked up to as role models and their choices should reflect as such.

Rachel Alexander

Rachel Alexander is the editor of the Intellectual Conservative. She also serves as senior editor of The Stream.