Phyllis Schlafly
Republicans are getting a lot of unsolicited advice about how to recover from last year's defeat, and most of it is either ignorant or coming from people who don't have Republican party victories in their game plan. One of the worst of these bits of advice is that Republicans should join a bipartisan push for immigration amnesty.

Amnesty advocates shrink from using the word amnesty and try hard to shroud their message in deceptive words. So let's understand their vocabulary: reform, comprehensive, earned legal status and path to citizenship are all code words for amnesty.

At the recent conservative jamboree called CPAC, several panels and even star banquet speaker former Florida Governor Jeb Bush tried hard to soften or disguise the fact that their proposals are really amnesty. But conservatives agree with Rep. Steve King of Iowa that the essence of amnesty is to "reward them with the objective of their crime" and agree with Ann Coulter who told CPAC that amnesty is "suicidal" for Republicans.

Promises by the amnesty advocates to secure the border after the illegals are granted residency, or even simultaneously, are unacceptable and unbelievable. In the famous words of Yogi Berra, an oral agreement is not worth the paper it is written on.

The American people want the U.S. government to obey and enforce existing laws. That starts with building a fence on our southern border, which was required by a 2006 federal law, and signed by President George W. Bush in a well-publicized photo op. Instead of building the fence that Congress ordered, the government spent nearly $2 billion building what was called a virtual fence. It didn't work, and now it is being dismantled at additional expense.

Here are the requirements that must be met before we start talking:

First, we want and expect a border fence to be built like the efficient, successful fence that protects the border near San Diego. That means a 12-foot-high double fence with a road in between.

Second, we want enforcement of the entry-exit system, whereby people admitted on visas are tracked to make sure they leave the U.S. when their temporary visit expires. That's another federal law that has never been enforced.

Third, we want a law that requires employers to use E-Verify for new and current employees. This is as simple as having retailers check your credit card when you make a purchase; just put your credit card or your Social Security number in a machine and you get an immediate answer as to whether it's valid.


Phyllis Schlafly

Phyllis Schlafly is a national leader of the pro-family movement, a nationally syndicated columnist and author of Feminist Fantasies.
 
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