Matt Towery

With so many people unemployed and needing a job, I can't help but wonder: Why are so many employed friends and associates of mine not working this week? This brings to mind the French. They essentially close down their country in August. And I have doubts about how hard they labor the other 11 months.

None of this applies to readers of this column, of course! All of us think we work hard. Many of us do. These are productive people. The ones in touch with reality.

Sean Hannity FREE

But for too many, it looks like holidays and various other mini-celebrations have turned a fairly regimented America into a land of people who have jobs, but with an asterisk by the word "job." Follow the calendar along with me and see if you agree that things have changed over the last generation or so.

Let's start with winter. That used to be tough for kids because there was no extended break between Christmas and Easter. The same went for my working dad and my work-at-home mother, who had to lighten up those dull days for my dad and me.

In years past, people returned to work right after Christmas and didn't get another day off until New Year's Day. Nowadays, that week between holidays is lost for commerce. Then comes the national college football championship, and along with it the following day, when many people are shaking off their hangovers.

Next thing you know, it's Super Bowl Sunday. That started as a "chips 'n' dip" gathering in the late '60s and early '70s. It's now morphed into five-alarm party fire with its own day-after of lost work production.

Lesser holidays are scattered over the following months, including spring break. Then it seems that many Americans treat the summer as a time to be fashionably missing in action from their jobs. That leaves only a few months for the country's business to get done.

The Halloween candy appears long before Halloween, and then most retail stores go up with their Christmas decorations before the Trick or Treat bag is half-empty. Thanksgiving initiates an endless string of parties and shopping sprees. Work becomes a naughty word. Even present-and-accounted-for employees often are at work in body only. Then we're back to New Year's again.

Add to that the everyday distractions of monitoring Facebook, swapping junk emails and making cell phone calls or sending texts. It's little wonder that the definition of "productivity" in America is apparently being redefined.


Matt Towery

Matt Towery is a former National Republican legislator of the year and author of Powerchicks: How Women Will Dominate America.
 
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