Matt Barber

Liberals are nervous. They should be. As the 2012 election grows closer a soft rumble builds throughout thousands of Evangelical Christian churches across America. Pastors and churchgoers alike are waking up to the disturbing reality that we as a nation have strayed drastically from our historical Judeo-Christian moorings.

Though many may try, none can honestly deny that the results have been devastating to our culture.

Once the political tectonic plates shift, there is bipartisan agreement that we can expect an earthshaking groundswell of grassroots advocacy and action to rival - if not surpass - the 2010 Tea Party effect.

Along with their ideological Tea Party cousins - many of whom are one and the same - tens of millions of potential Bible-believing voters are being encouraged - to the extent they need encouragement - to vote their values in 2012. The catalyst? President Obama's discredited secular-socialist push to "fundamentally transform America."

This burgeoning Christian movement has not gone unnoticed by the left. For instance, in a piece headlined: "Evangelical pastors heed a political calling for 2012," the Los Angeles Times recently reported, "Formerly apolitical preachers in states like Iowa, backed by astute organizers and big donors, are mobilizing congregations for the election."

"Religious leaders have long been active in political causes," the newspaper notes. "Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. used his Baptist pulpit to agitate for civil rights, and fiery televangelists Pat Robertson and Jerry Falwell awakened the religious right in the 1970s and 1980s with calls to fight what they saw as America's moral decay.

"But the current awakening is different," the piece continues. "It springs from the grass roots - small and independent churches - and is fueled by emails and YouTube videos. And it is driven less by personality than by the biblical teaching to be the 'salt' and 'light' of society - in other words, to have a beneficial influence on the world."

Indeed, the Moral Majority, led by Falwell and other venerable Christian leaders, was central to placing Ronald Reagan in the White House in 1980. Remarkably, the movement's contemporary counterpart promises to play a key role in President Obama's eviction from that same residence some 32 years later.

At the time, Falwell gave a rousing call to arms: "What is wrong in America today?" he asked. "We preachers - and there are 340,000 of us who pastor churches - we hold the nation in our hand. And I say this to every preacher: We are going to stand accountable before God if we do not stand up and be counted."

Falwell's words ring no less true today.


Matt Barber

Matt Barber is founder and editor-in chief of BarbWire.com. He is an author, columnist, cultural analyst and an attorney concentrating in constitutional law. Having retired as an undefeated heavyweight professional boxer, Matt has taken his fight from the ring to the culture war. (Follow Matt on Twitter: @jmattbarber).