Mark Davis

A young black man dies from a police gunshot, and a community bursts into presumptuous anger as if it knows racism is afoot.

That community contains rioters who are not sufficiently condemned by officials at any level, local, state or national.

As images of tear gas clouds in suburbia subside, we are hit with fresh pictures of an Islamist monster beheading an American citizen while warning our President and our people that he and his brethren are just warming up. Attorney General Eric Holder responds by opening a criminal investigation, as if this were a stabbing on a Georgetown street.

Accountability is dead. Long battered against the ropes, the concept of identifying and delivering consequences to the proper purveyors of various evils has been lost in a jungle of political correctness and racial paralysis.

When accountability occurs in an atmosphere of clarity and certainty, our worst problems can get better. One of our worst national problems is artificially-heightened racial discord. One of our worst global problems is the threat of radical Islam. Progress is crippled in both arenas because of the inability, or lack of willingness, to reach proper conclusions about good guys and bad guys, and the lack of spine to deliver proper consequences to the bad guys.

In Ferguson, it is impossible to know for certain which side to take in the shooting of Michael Brown by Officer Darren Wilson. But that doesn’t mean we don’t have identifiable bad guys.

It is bad to bring a self-aggrandizing caravan of race-baiting into that tense town. That would be Al Sharpton.

It is bad to suggest that a “vigorous prosecution” is in order before we have sufficient basis to believe a crime was committed. It is bad to speak of “justice for Michael Brown’s family” without knowing whether Michael was the victim or the aggressor. That would be Missouri Governor Jay Nixon.

It is bad to sashay into Ferguson to weave yarns of past racial slights you have suffered when you know the intended supposition is that Ferguson is a proven source of such mistreatment. That would be Eric Holder.

So there is plenty of bad behavior to go around in the Ferguson mess, but these misdeeds will go unpunished amid a protective media culture in a nation afraid to call out race-baiters.

This should not be surprising, for we are even hesitant to call out rioters. An African-American president and attorney-general would be powerful forces if they were to deliver the following message: