Lee  Culpepper

This past Monday as math teacher Mike Landsberry lay shot and dying on a playground’s basketball court in Sparks, Nevada, America’s public education system on the East Coast was already at work subjecting more children to the perils of another lethal threat: political correctness. Make no mistake about it -- political correctness is the impetus of gun-free zones. It is also destroying the minds of America’s children while leaving them physically vulnerable.

Incredibly, teacher unions and other progressive liberals hail this indoctrination in public schools as an advancement in education. But as disturbing as that fact may be, this ever-expanding educational rot goes unnoticed by a plethora of apathetic parents. Meanwhile, the curriculum of political correctness deserves plenty of credit for this week’s random terror by an out-of-control seventh grader with a 9mm handgun who executed Mr. Landsberry and attempted to murder two 12-year-old classmates before killing himself.

As a recovering high school English teacher, I do not find this tragedy or any of the other school shootings surprising at all. Compelling teachers to focus on feelings, self-esteem, and gay rights leaves teachers with little time to teach students about critical thinking and fact analysis — you know, skills students will probably need in life, particularly should they ever be confronted with a murderer at school.

I have endured the liberal influence and caustic system firsthand, and I promise you that something is seriously wrong on every level when a student reaches high school still reading and writing at a third-grade level. The students’ pervasive apathy is even more disheartening. Students are often infected with a self-absorbed, entitlement attitude that seems intentionally cultivated as the system passes them along whether they are academically competent or not. Of course, if their makeup, clothing, or gadgets are socially acceptable, who cares if they cannot think, let alone read or write?

Deficient students (often encouraged by inept parents) generally expect grades they have not earned. They justify their shoddy performances and their degenerate peers because they feel entitled to their actions, as well as their inflated grades. I guess it is hard to blame them really when you consider the system has conditioned them to expect full credit for just completing an assignment.


Lee Culpepper

A former Marine Corps officer and a recovering high school English teacher, Lee Culpepper is a Christian, husband, writer, and mentor. Read and share other articles by Lee Culpepper at TheBlaze and BearingArms. Email Lee your feedback or inquiries here or contact Lee on Twitter @drcoolpepper.



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