Larry Elder
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Is the NAACP demanding that it not be taken seriously?

The civil rights group passed a resolution condemning "bigotry within" the limited-government/constitutionalist Tea Party movement, as if there is any large group without idiots -- and, in this case, inconsequential ones at that.

Four percent of Democrats -- and 3 percent of Republicans -- according to a Los Angeles Times/Bloomberg poll, would refuse to vote for a black presidential candidate whose views mirror their own. That comes out to almost 3 million Democratic bigots. How does that compare with the number of presumed bigots within the Tea Party?

Julian Bond, NAACP chairman from 1998 until 2010, routinely called the entire Republican Party racist and fascist -- and got away with it. These outrageous attacks -- not unlike the waving of Bush/Hitler signs at anti-Bush rallies -- provoked no indignation from those now hyperventilating over the Tea Party's alleged "racist elements."

My book about the declining significance of racism in America, "What's Race Got to Do with It?" describes Bond's vulgar attacks against President George W. Bush: "(Bush) has selected nominees from the Taliban wing of American politics, appeased the wretched appetites of the extreme right wing, and chosen Cabinet officials whose devotion to the Confederacy is nearly canine in its uncritical affection." OK, this was before 9/11.

But in December 2001, three months after the terrorist attacks, Bond savaged Attorney General John Ashcroft: "He knows something about the Taliban, coming from, as he does, from that wing of American politics." And in June 2004, at a Take Back America conference, Bond said, "(Republicans) draw their most rabid supporters from the Taliban wing of American politics." And speaking at historically black Fayetteville State University in North Carolina, Bond said, "The Republican Party would have the American flag and the swastika flying side by side."

Is it not racist to brand the entire GOP racist because an "insufficient" number of blacks chose to join it?

Despite America's obvious progress toward the Rev. Martin Luther King's vision of a colorblind society, Bond chose fighting racism as the NAACP's No. 1 priority: "We want (the NAACP) to be a social justice organization. ... Our mission is to fight racial discrimination and provide social justice. ... We deal with the beast itself. ... It is popular to say that we are in a post-civil rights period, but we don't believe that."

By "the beast," Bond meant anti-black racism.

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Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.