Janet M. LaRue

“I think I have an ongoing conversation with God. Throughout the day I’m constantly asking myself questions about what I’m doing, why I am doing it.” --Barack Obama

Christine Falsani of the Chicago Sun Times interviewed then-U.S. Senate candidate Barack Obama in 2004 about his religious beliefs. According to Falsani:

Obama reads the Bible, though not as regularly as he’d like given the ever-increasing demands on his time that political life has brought. But he does find time to pray. “It’s not formal, me getting on my knees,” he says. “I think I have an ongoing conversation with God. Throughout the day I’m constantly asking myself questions about what I’m doing, why I am doing it. … And so the biggest challenge, I think, is always maintaining your moral compass. Those are the conversations I'm having with God internally. I'm measuring my actions against that inner voice that, for me at least, is audible, is active. It tells me where I think I'm on track and where I'm off track. … He uses prayer as a litmus test for altruism? ‘Yeah, something like that,’ he says, smiling sheepishly. ‘The most powerful political moments for me come when I feel like my actions are aligned with a certain truth. I can feel it. When I’m talking to a group and I’m saying something truthful, I can feel a power that comes out of those statements that is different than when I’m just being glib or clever.’”

On the subject of governing, Obama told Falsani:

“I think there is an enormous danger on the part of public figures to rationalize or justify their actions by claiming God’s mandate.”

As President, Obama has repeatedly ignored his own ominous warning.

Before an audience of construction workers with the backdrop of the Key Bridge connecting Washington, D.C. with Virginia, Obama on Wednesday pushed for passage of a $60 billion jobs bill that he claimed “will help private sector companies put hundreds of thousands of construction workers back on the job rebuilding our roads, our airports, our bridges and our transit systems.”


Janet M. LaRue

Jan LaRue is Senior Legal Analyst with the American Civil Rights Union; former Chief Counsel at Concerned for Women; Legal Studies Director at Family Research Council; and Senior Counsel for the National Law Center for Children and Families. Be the first to read Janet LaRue's column. Sign up today and receive Townhall.com delivered each morning to your inbox.