Emmett Tyrrell
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WASHINGTON -- Christine O'Donnell, the tea party-supported Republican candidate for U.S. Senate in Delaware, has no secrets. The press even has gone back to her high-school years and found that she "dabbled" in witchcraft. But now, Jeffrey Lord of The American Spectator has been scrutinizing her opponent, Democratic candidate Chris Coons. Lord did not have to go back to Coons' high-school days. He found quite a lot in Coons' infatuation with Marxism, starting in college. Coons found Marx about the time that large numbers of Marxist pols behind the Iron Curtain had given him up. By the 1990s, even jailers and torturers were forsaking old Karl, but not Coons.

Now, if you read about Coons in The New York Times or The Washington Post, you will not find anything particularly diverting about him. He began college as a young Republican and ended as a young Democrat. As the Post writes in profiling him, he "spent time in South Africa and Kenya doing relief work." The Times never mentions Coons' African sojourn but only talks about his later work with the homeless, the Investor Responsibility Research Center and the "I Have A Dream" Foundation. Apparently, he has been a goody-goody but, in the end, a bore.

Yet Lord went back further. He found that before Coons became the Democratic opponent of O'Donnell, he was profiled in early May in Politico. In that profile, Politico reports that as a 21-year-old about to graduate from Amherst, he wrote a piece in the college newspaper that was titled "Chris Coons: The Making of a Bearded Marxist." Apparently, there was more to that trip to Africa than he would like voters to recall or than the Post chronicled.

Coons reported in the student newspaper that his trip to Africa was what we now call a transformative experience. "It is only too easy to return from Africa glad to be American and smugly thankful for our wealth and freedom," Politico quotes the returning student as saying. "Instead, Amherst had taught me to question, so in turn I questioned Amherst, and America." The groundwork for this questioning began before he left for Africa, during a course in cultural anthropology that "undermined the accepted value of progress and the cultural superiority of the West." A course on the Vietnam War also caused him to "suspect ... that the ideal of America as a 'beacon of freedom and justice, providing hope for the world' was not exactly based in reality."

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Emmett Tyrrell

R. Emmett Tyrrell Jr. is founder and editor in chief of The American Spectator and co-author of Madame Hillary: The Dark Road to the White House.
 
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