Dick Morris and  Eileen McGann

In January 1998, right after The Washington Post revealed President Bill Clinton’s relationship with Monica, I spoke with him about his predicament. Shell-shocked and stunned at the calls for his impeachment, he knew he was facing the fight of his life. At first, he was vintage Bill Clinton: maudlin, sad and full of self-pity. But as we talked, he gradually changed his tone. Admitting that he was not innocent, but recognizing his diminishing support, he then told me defiantly: “Well, we’ll just have to win.”

Several years later, I was surprised to read in Sidney Blumenthal’s memoirs that then-first lady Hillary Clinton had used the exact same words on the exact same day in a conversation with the White House aide. “We’ll just have to win.”

That’s how the Clintons think — no matter what, they have to win. Winning is everything, and how you do it is not determined by any inner sense of values or ethics, but by a resolve to do whatever needs to be done, no more and certainly no less. So, on that day in January 1998 — because they had to win — their campaign to discredit a 23-year-old intern began in the White House. Private investigators dug up her old boyfriends. White House operatives spread the word that it was the president who was the victim. The young woman was an unbalanced stalker.

As impeachment unfolded, the extramarital affairs of key members of the Republican leadership in the House were suddenly outed.

Hillary Clinton began the disinformation campaign. Appearing on “The Today Show,” she righteously claimed that there was nothing to support Lewinsky’s claims and insisted that Bill was just “ministering” to a “troubled young woman.” Then came the blue dress and the Clintons finally — and reluctantly — changed gears.

But they never changed philosophies. Winning is still everything. No matter who gets destroyed, offended or hurt in the process.

We’ve seen it throughout Hillary’s campaign: the race-baiting by Bill Clinton in South Carolina and by Hillary in Kentucky. His comparison of Obama to Jesse Jackson and her talk about “hard-working whites” was not accidental. The Clintons don’t make verbal mistakes.

Everything they say is deliberate. And then Bill Clinton actually had the nerve to say that it was the Obama campaign and not him — that they had played the race card. Once again, he’s the victim.

Now Bill and Hillary are desperate to keep Hillary in the race. Despite mathematical impossibility, the Clintons are biding their time. Out of money and out of delegates, they are waiting for some unknown force to suddenly emerge and change the race. That’s why Hillary made the reference to Bobby Kennedy.


Dick Morris and Eileen McGann

Dick Morris, a former political adviser to Sen. Trent Lott (R-Miss.) and President Bill Clinton, is the author of 2010: Take Back America. To get all of Dick Morris’s and Eileen McGann’s columns for free by email, go to www.dickmorris.com