Diana West

This week, the commander of NATO, U.S. Adm. James Stavridis, let the jihad out of the bag. He told the U.S. Senate that among the Libyan rebels -- you know, our guys, the ones on whose behalf we've fired off about $1 billion worth of ordinance at Libya -- "we have seen flickers in the intelligence of potential al-Qaida, Hezbollah."

That means the U.S. military is fighting on behalf of the flickers that took down the World Trade Center in 2001 and the Marine Barracks in Beirut in 1983.

Does anyone care?

Next question: Wouldn't we all salute if Stavridis had next told the Senate that, as a result of this heinous policy, which orders U.S. forces to participate in a mission to advance the cause of global jihad, he would be stepping down from his command in protest?

Sigh. Instead, Stavridis reassured the Senate, "We are examining very closely the content, composition, the personalities, who are the leaders of these opposition forces," he said.

Next question: Do I feel better?

The Daily Mail picked up the story, noting: "The comments have sparked an embarrassing diplomatic spat between NATO and the U.S. ambassador to the United Nations Susan Rice, who disagreed that al-Qaida was involved in the rebel movement. `I would like to think I'm reading much of the same stuff and no,' Ms. Rice told Fox News when asked whether she had seen any evidence to support Stavridis' assessment."

No evidence. Not even a shimmer, according to Ms. Rice. That's funny. I've been reading, not intelligence reports, but regular news stories about the predilection for jihad among the people of eastern Libya, which is the seat of the rebellion, and which, according to a 2007 West Point study, sent more jihadis per capita to Iraq to fight American forces than any other region in the world. One of their military leaders, Abdel Hakim al-Hasidi, is reported to have fought for years in Afghanistan -- and, to be precise, that would have been against us and for bin Laden -- or so he used to brag, back a week or so ago when it wasn't politically risky.

Now the rebs are practically media-savvy, as the Independent discovered: "`We are not al-Qaida,' were the first words of Khalid Arshad Ali as he dusted the triggering mechanism of an anti-aircraft artillery gun. `We are Mujahedin. We are here to fight for Libya and no one else. We are Muslims in this country and we are all Sunnis. We know that Gaddafi is getting paid by the Jews. We know that Israel is supplying him with special guns. He is not a proper Muslim and it is our duty to fight him.' "


Diana West

Diana West is the author of American Betrayal: The Secret Assault on Our Nation's Character (St. Martin's Press, 2013), and The Death of the Grown-Up: How America's Arrested Development Is Bringing Down Western Civilization (St. Martin's Press, 2007).