Daniel Pipes
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"Lunacy." That's how Danny Danon describes Prime Minister Binyamin Netanyahu's decision to hand over 104 killers to the Palestinian Authority as a "goodwill gesture."

He's hardly alone, as many observers (including myself) are outraged by this move. But Danon, 42, has a unique place in this debate because he (1) sits in Israel's parliament as a member of Netanyahu's Likud Party, he (2) is chairman of Likud's powerful Central Committee, and he (3) serves as Israel's deputy minister of Defense. In American terms, his criticism resembles Gen. Stanley McChrystal's 2010 interview mocking Vice President Joe Biden. But McChrystal was gone within days whereas Danon continues to gain influence and stature.

Danon's ability to denounce his own prime minister's actions points to his not being a routine politician. Three qualities stand out: a devotion to principle, a mastery of tactics, and the ability to articulate a vision.

Danon has remained true to the core principles of his party and his country. His righteous opposition when his party makes mistakes -- such as the 2009 freeze on building residences for Jews on the West Bank or accepting the two-state solution -- shows a strength of character. As he points out, "It's not easy being in a room of thirty people, alone saying no."

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