Cal  Thomas

The Maryland legislature recently voted to abolish capital punishment in the state, making Maryland the sixth state in the last six years to eliminate the death penalty.

The primary argument for repealing the law is that our justice system is imperfect and it's possible an innocent person could be condemned. Indeed, anti-death penalty activists presented Kirk Bloodsworth, a former death-row inmate, convicted of the 1984 rape and murder of a 9-year-old girl. His conviction was overturned on appeal after the court found the prosecution had withheld exculpatory evidence from the defense. However, Bloodsworth was retried and sentenced to two life terms, a conviction later upheld on appeal. In 1993, Bloodsworth was exonerated after DNA linked someone else to the crime.

Death penalty opponents say the law is worth repealing if just one innocent life is saved.

Richard Dieter, executive director of the Death Penalty Information Center, told The Washington Post, "State after state is deciding that the death penalty is simply not worth the risks and costs to retain." He predicts other states will soon follow Maryland's lead. According to the Post, 33 states still retain capital punishment, though "many are using it more sparingly than in the past."

In the debate over the death penalty some have argued that it's a deterrent to crime, which can't be proved, any more than it is provable that abolishing it will encourage some to kill, knowing the worse they will face is life in prison without parole. Others have argued the death penalty is "too expensive" because the court system allows for numerous appeals, a process that takes years.

During the debate in Maryland, Democratic State Senator John C. Astle told the Post, "The idea of strapping someone down and deliberately taking their life -- it was a little difficult for me."

Which brings me to abortion; abortion may not involve the "strapping down" of a convicted felon, but it takes a life.

Maryland's governor, Martin O'Malley (D), has been a passionate advocate for repealing the death penalty, but equally as passionate in opposing limits to abortion in his state. "I believe that it is an issue that is best left to the individual conscience of women," he told the Maryland Catholic Conference last October.


Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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