Cal  Thomas
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Alexandr Solzhenitsyn's work and life can best be described as those of a prophet. The prophet died last Sunday at the age of 89. Solzhenitsyn was not only a critic of the Soviet Union, of communism and Socialism, he showed the West - and particularly the United States - more than a few of its own flaws.

Thirty years ago this summer, Solzhenitsyn gave an address at Harvard that was biting in its critique, exemplary in its wisdom and visionary in its predictions for what the future would hold should America and the West remain on their present path. It was a monumental speech that many academics - at Harvard and elsewhere - who had cheered Solzhenitsyn while he resided in the gulag, hated, but I loved.

Solzhenitsyn warned the West not to be deluded by what he said was a false belief that all nations yearn to be like us. This thinking is at the heart of President Bush's doctrine for dealing with the Arab and Muslim world. Solzhenitsyn called this "the blindness of superiority" and warned against thinking that only "wicked governments" temporarily prevent other nations from "adopting the Western way of life."

The Russian novelist observed that a "decline in courage" has affected the West and especially, "the intellectual elite, causing an impression of loss of courage by the entire society. Should one point out that from ancient times decline in courage has been considered the beginning of the end?"

Solzhenitsyn said that in the West, the pursuit of happiness through self-gratification and materialism has replaced moral and character development: "The constant desire to have still more things and a still better life and the struggle to obtain them imprints many Western faces with worry and even depression. The majority of people have been granted well-being to an extent their fathers and grandfathers could not even dream about." And yet, "Today, well-being in the life of Western society has begun to reveal its pernicious mask."

What about America's emphasis on individual rights? Solzhenitsyn said the result has been to ignore the welfare of the many: "The defense of individual rights has reached such extremes as to make society as a whole defenseless against certain individuals. It is time, in the West, to defend not so much human rights as human obligations."

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Cal Thomas

Cal Thomas is co-author (with Bob Beckel) of the book, "Common Ground: How to Stop the Partisan War That is Destroying America".
 
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