Brent Bozell

We've endured two years of endless journalistic jawboning about Barack Obama, the great racial healer who would bind us together, the man who would get everyone singing on a sun-soaked hilltop with a bottle of Coke and a smile. So now that he's in, what has he got? We have Obama's attorney general, Eric Holder, telling us how Americans remain "voluntarily socially segregated," and that while we have the foolish pride to think of the United States as an ethnic melting pot, we have always been and continue to be a "nation of cowards."

Whether you support him politically or not, Obama's election could not help but cause Americans to grow more positive about the state of American race relations. ABC News polls showed the number of Americans saying racism is a "big problem" dropped by more than half, from 54 percent in 1996 to 26 percent now. It was down sharply among blacks and whites alike. Not only that, 58 percent guessed Obama's presidency would improve race relations. How does the Obama administration react? We are a "nation of cowards."

If anyone was cowardly about frank conversations on race, it was Obama and his supporters in the news media. They're the ones who refused to raise the issues of racial quotas, profiling and illegal immigration, no doubt for fear of upsetting the white troglodytes. They're the ones who kept Jesse Jackson and Al Sharpton in a storage closet for more than a year. They're the ones who spun themselves dizzy insisting that the lunatic rants of his minister Jeremiah Wright only made Barack Obama look nobler. Obama was the man who declared he couldn't disassociate himself from Wright, and then did exactly that a few weeks later when Wright's fanaticism had become apparent to all.

And his administration is now lecturing us on "cowardice"?

Then there were the journalistic cowards covering the "nation of cowards" speech. Wait, did I say "covering"? You couldn't find a news story about it in that alleged paper of record, the New York Times, Time magazine or on CBS. It's not like the coward line was hard to find. It was the first sentence of the second paragraph of Holder's remarks.

Others tiptoed past it. The Washington Post gave it a tiny brief of 222 words. NBC anchor Brian Williams simply offered one clip, calling it "a very blunt speech." George Stephanopoulos sat in the evening anchor chair at ABC and also offered only one soundbite, describing it as "an emotional analysis of racism." No one had time for outraged critics.


Brent Bozell

Founder and President of the Media Research Center, Brent Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America.
 
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