Austin Bay

Last April during the Summit of the Americas, President Barack Obama shook hands with Venezuela's Hugo Chavez. Their greet-and-grip photo op had that street-smart flair -- hooked thumbs, hip dude grins, brothers in populist cool.

"Hey," the defenders of this particular example of self-proclaimed "smart diplomacy" argued, "the Summit's going down in Trinidad, off Venezuela's coast, man, so Barry's in Hugo's 'hood, on his turf? And Barry O. -- truly spherical -- he's resettin' all these foreign relations damaged by that jackboot jive suit George Bush. Swallow it, you warmongerin' stuffed shirts. High fivin' Hugo is a step towards peace in our time -- "

Ah, yes, peace in our time. Neville Chamberlain coined that phrase in 1938, after Munich, didn't he?

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The Barry and Hugo good buds handshake squandered American prestige and gave the dictator a propaganda coup at a moment when a cold presidential stare and furrowed brow were the appropriate diplomatic and facial expressions.

In February Chavez had ramrodded a national referendum that allowed what the International Crisis Group (ICG) calls "the indefinite re-election of all elected officials" and "marked an acceleration of his (Chavez') Bolivarian revolution" and "socialism of the 21st century." The ICG adds that Chavez's "government has progressively abandoned core liberal democracy principles guaranteed under the Inter-American Democratic Charter and the American Convention on Human Rights."

No, that isn't cool. Imposing a strongman militarist government and inciting regional warfare should not elicit even the perception of an American president's 'atta boy.

Perhaps President Obama has had a chance to reflect on his encounter with Chavez. It should serve as a teaching moment -- to rip-off Obama's phrase for resolving that nasty Massachusetts spat between a Harvard prof and a Cambridge cop -- that personal style is a very limited foreign policy tool.

Chavez poses an increasingly difficult foreign policy problem, and it's high time Obama got wise.

Hugo is making trouble in his neighborhood. This week, the Venezuelan dictator announced he is buying Russian missiles and rockets -- scads of them. This is not the first time Hugo has stocked up on Russian weapons. He's been buying lots of MiGs and may buy up to nine Russian subs. Nor is this the first time he has made belligerent threats to Colombia.


Austin Bay

Austin Bay is the author of three novels. His third novel, The Wrong Side of Brightness, was published by Putnam/Jove in June 2003. He has also co-authored four non-fiction books, to include A Quick and Dirty Guide to War: Third Edition (with James Dunnigan, Morrow, 1996).
 
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