Texas Finds 95,000 Non-US Citizens Registered To Vote -- 58,000 Have Actually Voted In Recent Elections

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Posted: Jan 25, 2019 6:37 PM
Texas Finds 95,000 Non-US Citizens Registered To Vote -- 58,000 Have Actually Voted In Recent Elections

On Friday January 25, Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton announced that 95,000 individuals registered to vote in the Lone Star State have been identified as "Non-US Citizens," meaning they are illegally registered to vote. Further evidence brought forth by Texas Secretary of State David Whitely confirms that 58,000 of these individuals have broken the law and voted in "one or more" recent elections.

“Every single instance of illegal voting threatens democracy in our state and deprives individual Texans of their voice," AG Paxton said in a statement. "My Election Fraud Unit stands ready to investigate and prosecute crimes against the democratic process when needed."

According to a press release issued by the Attorney General's office, while non-US citizens are legally allowed to obtain driver's licenses and other forms of ID, "only citizens are eligible to vote." Furthermore, the Sec. of State's office notes that "Voting in an election in which the person knows he or she is not eligible to vote is a second-degree felony in the State of Texas. " 

Sec. of State Whitely discovered a "total of approximately 95,000 individuals" illegally registered to vote after a year-long evaluation of Texas county voting registrars. Today, his office announced that 58,000 of these individuals actually voted in one or more election. 

"Integrity and efficiency of elections in Texas require accuracy of our state's voter rolls, and my office is committed to using all available tools under the law to maintain an accurate list of registered voters. Our agency has provided extensive training opportunities to county voter registrars so that they can properly perform list maintenance activities in accordance with federal and state law, which affords every registered voter the chance to submit proof of eligibility," Sec. of State Whitely told the media. 

The report notes that Sec. of State Whitely "immediately provided the data in its possession to the Texas Attorney General's office, as the Secretary of State has no statutory enforcement authority to investigate or prosecute alleged illegal activity in connection with an election."

"Nothing is more vital to preserving our Constitution than the integrity of our voting process, and my office will do everything within its abilities to solidify trust in every election in the state of Texas. I applaud Secretary of State Whitley for his proactive work in safeguarding our elections," AG Paxton added.