ICYMI: Another 'Indigenous' Person Was Exposed As a Total Fraud

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Posted: Nov 26, 2021 3:00 PM
ICYMI: Another 'Indigenous' Person Was Exposed As a Total Fraud

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I almost forgot about this one. Sorry, folks—it's an older story, but one that's always relevant given the left's obsession with being politically correct. And when Sen. Liz Warren (D-MA), our fake Indian, decided to open her stupid mouth about how turkey farmers have colluded to jack up prices, I just had to circle back to this story. Before I start, Warren thinks turkey farmers are a cartel? She's been scalped of common sense. 

Back to fake Indians, we have this story coming from Canada. Carrie Bourassa was marketed as one of the nation's leading experts in indigenous people's health. She got all dressed up. She gave what was supposedly her real name, and it's all a lie (via CBC): 

With a feather in her hand and a bright blue shawl and Métis sash draped over her shoulders, Carrie Bourassa made her entrance to deliver a TEDx Talk at the University of Saskatchewan in Saskatoon in September 2019, where she detailed her personal rags-to-riches story.

“My name is Morning Star Bear,” she said, choking up. “I’m just going to say it — I’m emotional.”

The crowd applauded and cheered.

“I’m Bear Clan. I’m Anishinaabe Métis from Treaty Four Territory,” Bourassa said, explaining that she grew up in Regina’s inner city in a dysfunctional family surrounded by addiction, violence and racism.

That's the backstory from a CBC article in late October. Of course, the bombshell is that this woman is of European descent. Also, it was her colleagues that called her out. Bourassa is now on academic leave following this revelation, along with the removal from her government advisory roles (via The Guardian): 

She recently stepped down from her role as scientific director for Indigenous peoples health at the Canadian Institute of Health Research (CIHR). Bourassa had been described by the CIHR as “a Métis woman, a highly regarded Indigenous researcher” who “has been a selfless leader and a tireless champion for all Indigenous peoples in this country”.

The CBC investigation has drawn comparisons with the case of Rachel Dolezal, an American academic and activist who was accused of passing herself off as black. A Métis professor who worked with Bourassa told CBC she was “the modern-day Grey Owl” – a reference to Archibald Stansfeld Belaney, the British-born conservationist and writer who passed himself off as a Native American in the early 20th century.

CBC reported that people who worked with Bourassa had expressed disquiet about her account of her ancestry, and some examined her genealogical records, which reportedly showed that her ancestors were of Russian, Polish and Czechoslovakian descent.

In an email to CBC, Bourassa said she had been adopted as Métis by a friend of her grandfather and had subsequently been adopted into other communities. She accused the broadcaster of running a “smear campaign” against her, adding she was “shocked and dismayed at the recent attack on my identity”.

So, she has just as much Native American blood as I do—and I have none. This reeks of Warren's "we have high cheekbones" story to explain her racial hoax. It's always the white liberals going to extreme lengths to be insufferable. 

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