Wait, That's Why It Took So Long for This Newspaper to Release the...
So, No One Finds It Fishy That the FBI All of a Sudden...
New York Appeals Court Announces Decision on Dems' Non-Citizen Voting Scheme
Biden's Border Invasion Is Going Just As He Planned
Democrats and Putin
Afghanistan Is a 'Jihadi Utopia' Again
The New American Antisemitism
New Report Reveals Alarming Details About Commander's Attacks on Secret Service Agents
Biden's Border Crisis Is Now on Full Display in Times Square Billboard
El Salvador's Bukele Has the Perfect Response to a BBC Reporter Concerned About...
FBI Is Now Probing Illinois' 'Dictator' Mayor
Putin Is Pushing Where There's Mush
The National MS Society Ousted a 90-Year-Old Volunteer. Here's What Happened Next.
Poll: Americans Favor This Common-Sense Abortion Limit By a Double-Digit Margin
Rep. Wesley Hunt Shares Hard Truths for the Biden Administration on the Border
Tipsheet

Pakistan Blames NATO for Death of 24 Soldiers Saturday

UPDATE: A new report from the Guardian says a senior western official called the actions that resulted in the death of several Pakistani military members 'self-defense.'

Advertisement

As if Pakistan was not already a volatile enough ally, the death of 24 Pakistani soliders due to what the country says was NATO airfire has made the country decide to temporarily close border crossings used by NATO for their work in Afghanistan:

Islamabad retaliated by closing the border crossings used by the international coalition to supply its troops in neighboring Afghanistan.

The incident before dawn Saturday was a major blow to already strained relations between Islamabad and U.S.-led forces fighting in Afghanistan. It will add to perceptions in Pakistan that the American presence in the region is malevolent, and further fuel resentment toward the weak government in Islamabad for its cooperation with Washington.

It comes a little more than a year after a similar but less deadly strike near the Afghan border in which U.S. helicopters accidentally killed two Pakistani whom the pilots mistook for insurgents. Pakistan responded by closing the Torkham border crossing to NATO supplies for 10 days until the U.S. apologized.

On Saturday, Pakistan went further, closing both of the country's border crossings into landlocked Afghanistan. NATO trucks about 30 percent of the non-lethal supplies used by its Afghan-based forces through Pakistan. A short stoppage will have no effect on the war effort, but serves as a reminder of the leverage Pakistan has over the United States from the supply routes running through its territory.

A spokesman for NATO forces in Afghanistan, Brig. Gen. Carsten Jacobson, said it was "highly likely" that close air support called in by Afghan and coalition forces operating in the border area caused Pakistani casualties. NATO is investigating the incident to determine the exact details, he told BBC television.

Advertisement

Join the conversation as a VIP Member

Recommended

Trending on Townhall Videos

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement