Romanian Hacker: Yes, I Penetrated Hillary's Emails, And It Was Pretty Easy, Too

Guy Benson
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Posted: May 05, 2016 11:30 AM
Romanian Hacker: Yes, I Penetrated Hillary's Emails, And It Was Pretty Easy, Too

The Romanian hacker known as "Guccifer" who was extradited to the United States, apparently in connection to the FBI's criminal investigation into Hillary Clinton's national security-compromising email scheme, tells Fox News that he accessed the former Secretary of State's email server on multiple occasions. Clinton's unsecure server contained more than 2,000 classified emails, including at least 22 that contained sensitive information at the level of "top secret" and above:

The infamous Romanian hacker known as “Guccifer,” speaking exclusively with Fox News, claimed he easily – and repeatedly – breached former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton’s personal email server in early 2013. "For me, it was easy ... easy for me, for everybody," Marcel Lehel Lazar, who goes by the moniker "Guccifer," told Fox News from a Virginia jail where he is being held. Guccifer’s potential role in the Clinton email investigation was first reported by Fox News last month. The hacker subsequently claimed he was able to access the server – and provided extensive details about how he did it and what he found – over the course of a half-hour jailhouse interview and a series of recorded phone calls with Fox News...

Lazar emphasized that he used readily available web programs to see if the server was “alive” and which ports were open. Lazar identified programs like netscan, Netmap, Wireshark and Angry IP, though it was not possible to confirm independently which, if any, he used. In the process of mining data from the Blumenthal account, Lazar said he came across evidence that others were on the Clinton server. "As far as I remember, yes, there were … up to 10, like, IPs from other parts of the world,” he said. With no formal computer training, he did most of his hacking from a small Romanian village. Lazar said he chose to use "proxy servers in Russia," describing them as the best, providing anonymity. Cyber experts who spoke with Fox News said the process Lazar described is plausible.

This experienced hacker says his relatively rudimentary methods were sufficient to penetrate Clinton's emails -- and claims that "up to 10" IP addresses had accessed her system.  Data security experts told Fox that Guccifer's account of how he went about breaking into the unsecure emails of America's top diplomat checks out; this isn't forensic confirmation that he's telling the truth, but it's plausible on a technological level.  It is confirmed, however, that Guccifer did illegally access unofficial Clinton adviser Sidney Blumenthal's private emails, which is how the public discovered that she withheld official emails from public scrutiny.  That hack exposed two lies: That Clinton had turned over every single work-related message on her server (she hadn't), and that Blumenthal had not acted an adviser to the Secretary of State in any capacity (he had).  Clinton and her team have repeatedly asserted that her emails were not hacked.  If the Romanian's story is confirmed, this will be yet another lie, of which there have been many over the course of this scandal.  They're denying it:

In response to Lazar’s claims, the Clinton campaign issued a statement Wednesday night saying, "There is absolutely no basis to believe the claims made by this criminal from his prison cell. In addition to the fact he offers no proof to support his claims, his descriptions of Secretary Clinton's server are inaccurate. It is unfathomable that he would have gained access to her emails and not leaked them the way he did to his other victims.”

Several former Obama administration officials, including the CIA's deputy director and the Secretary of Defense have stated that it's very likely that hostile foreign powers -- such as Russia, China and Iran -- were able to access Clinton's classified emails.  Clinton was personally and specifically warned by State Department security that her set-up wasn't secure and could put national security secrets at risk.  She acknowledged the memo, then carried on with her risky conduct anyway.