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OPINION

FIRST-PERSON: That famous quote from St. Francis? He never said it

The opinions expressed by columnists are their own and do not necessarily represent the views of Townhall.com.
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COLORADO SPRINGS, Colo. (BP) -- Christians use lots of quotes. Pastors use them in their sermons constantly. Writers illustrate their points with them. Nothing wrong with that. They are quite helpful and encouraging in making a point.
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Save when the quote has no basis in fact.

We as evangelicals who claim we are committed to truth are certainly good at spreading falsehood, even if unintentionally. We can do better.

One very clever and popular quote we often knock around among ourselves is:

"Preach the Gospel at all times. When necessary, use words."

It is always attributed to St. Francis of Assisi -- founder of the Franciscan Order -- and is intended to say that proclaiming the Gospel by example is more virtuous than actually proclaiming with voice. It is a quote that has often rankled me because it seems to create a useless dichotomy between speech and action. Besides, the spirit behind it can be a little arrogant, intimating that those who "practice the Gospel" are more faithful to the faith than those who preach it.

But here's the fact: Our good Francis, who lived in the 13th century, never said such a thing.

None of his disciples, early or later biographers have these words coming from his mouth. It doesn't show up in any of his writings. Not even close, really. The closest comes from his Rule of 1221, Chapter XII on how the Franciscans should practice their preaching:

"No brother should preach contrary to the form and regulations of the holy Church nor unless he has been permitted by his minister. ... All the Friars ... should preach by their deeds."

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Essentially, make sure your deeds match your words. While there's a nice and good sentiment in the statement -- be sure you live out the grace and truth of the Gospel -- the notion as it is typically presented is neither practical, nor faithful to the Gospel of Christ. It does not align with St. Francis' own practice.

His first biographer, Thomas of Celeno, writing just three years after Francis' death, quotes him instructing his co-workers in the Gospel thusly, "The preacher must first draw from secret prayers what he will later pour out in holy sermons; he must first grow hot within before he speaks words that are in themselves cold."

Mark Galli, senior managing editor at Christianity Today, wrote a wonderful book on Francis as well as a clarifying brief article at ChristianityToday.com on the myth of this quote. He explains that Francis was quite a preacher, actually more along the lines of Jonathan Edwards or Billy Sunday than most of those who misquote him would like to think. Galli quotes Thomas' biography, "His words were neither hollow nor ridiculous, but filled with the power of the Holy Spirit, penetrating the marrow of the heart, so that listeners were turned to great amazement."

Our man clearly spent a great deal of time using his words when he preached, "sometimes preaching in up to five villages a day, often outdoors," Galli wrote. "In the country, Francis often spoke from a bale of straw or a granary doorway. In town, he would climb on a box or up steps in a public building. He preached to ... any who gathered to hear the strange but fiery little preacher from Assisi." He was sometimes so animated and passionate in his delivery that "his feet moved as if he were dancing."

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Duane Liftin, president emeritus of Wheaton College, recently addressed the trouble with this preach/practice dichotomy in an important article at ChristianityToday.com ("Works and Words: Why You Can't Preach the Gospel with Deeds"). Of preaching the Gospel in deed, he explains, "It's simply impossible to preach the Gospel without words. The Gospel is inherently verbal, and preaching the Gospel is inherently verbal behavior."

And the "deed" proclamation of the Gospel is not biblical, either. Paul asks the Church at Rome (Romans 10): "How then will they call on Him in whom they have not believed? How will they believe in Him whom they have not heard? And how will they hear without a preacher?"

So next time you hear one of your brothers or sisters in Christ use this quote to encourage or challenge you in your labors for our faith, gently guide them from the land of misinformation and make believe into truth.

Glenn T. Stanton is the director of family formation studies at Focus on the Family and the author of five books on various aspects of the family, his two most recent: "Secure Daughters Confident Sons, How Parents Guide Their Children into Authentic Masculinity and Femininity" (Waterbrook, 2011) and "The Ring Makes All the Difference: The Hidden Consequences of Cohabitation and the Strong Benefits of Marriage" (Moody, 2011). Get Baptist Press headlines and breaking news on Twitter (@BaptistPress), Facebook (Facebook.com/BaptistPress) and in your email (baptistpress.com/SubscribeBP.asp).

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Copyright (c) 2012 Southern Baptist Convention, Baptist Press www.BPNews.net

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