Guy Benson
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Is anyone else detecting a pattern here?
 

Harvard University isn’t the only one of Elizabeth Warren’s employers to have described her as a minority; so did the University of Pennsylvania. According to Penn’s 2005 “Minority Equity Report,” it too identified Warren, who taught there from 1987 to 1995, as a minority. On page 16 of the report, the now-Massachusetts Senate candidate is listed as a winner of the school’s Lindback Award in 1994. Unlike other names listed, though, her name is italicized and bolded to indicate her status as a minority faculty member. It’s the first indication to date of another one of Warren’s employers having listed her as a minority.


Here's the UPenn report in question. Sure enough, it proudly lists Warren as a "minority" faculty member, meaning that the school was under the clear impression that she was a Native American.  Why wouldn't they?  That's how she classified herself for at least nine year, and apparently nobody ever cared enough to verify her story.  On that very point, this story from Team Breitbart exposes how Harvard benefited just as much from Warren's "diversity" as she presumably did:
 

The pressure to hire more minority law professors continued over the next several years. This 1988 report in the NY Times announces the conclusion of a 24-hour sit-in of the office of James Vorenberg, then Dean of Harvard Law. Minority students at the law school staged the protest to demand that Harvard hire "20 women or members of minority groups in the next four years as tenured or tenure-track professors." Barack Obama would enter Harvard Law just a few months later...In 1995, with this controversy still swirling around the school, Harvard hired its first minority woman law professor, Elizabeth Warren. Warren had identified herself as Native American in legal directories since 1986. Her claim to minority status (1/32nd Cherokee, and even that is questionable) was later touted by the law school's spokesman in a 1996 Harvard Crimson article. He wrote, "Of 71 current Law School professors and assistant professors, 11 are women, five are black, one is Native American and one is Hispanic."


It's the perfect mutual back-scratching racket: Warren claims she's a minority, Harvard hires and promotes her, which then helps satisfy the politically correct harangues of the racial extortionists causing them headaches.  Win-win, baby!  We're not done yet.  Check out this fresh catch from the Boston Globe:
 

Meanwhile, the Globe has also obtained a portion of Warren’s 1973 application to Rutgers, where she attended law school. That document specifically asks: “Are you interested in applying for admission under the Program for Minority Group Students?” Warren answered “no.” In addition, a newly unearthed University of Texas personnel document shows that Warren listed herself as “white” when she taught at the law school there from 1981 to 1991. The undated document, obtained by the Globe through a public records request, supports Warren’s statement that she did not present herself as a Native American when hired for the job. But it leaves open the question of why she later listed herself as a minority in a legal directory that is often consulted by hiring deans.


So Warren applied to law school and landed her first job as a dull, pedestrian "white" woman. Then at some point, for some unknown reason, she began self-identifying as a Native American -- and also started getting hired by Ivy League institutions.  Fascinating, isn't it?  Finally, in case you missed it the other day, historical documents indicate that at least one of Warren's relatives was active in the movement to round up Cherokees and force them onto the infamous 'trail of tears.'  More documentation of this fact exists than does any confirmation of Warren's claimed 1/32nd Native American heritage.

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Guy Benson

Guy Benson is Townhall.com's Senior Political Editor. Follow him on Twitter @guypbenson.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography