Guy Benson

This post could be one sentence long: "New Jersey Governor Chris Christie held a press conference in Trenton this afternoon to once again say he will not seek the Republican presidential nomination in 2012."  But no.  The hyperventilating press has been panting about this announcement all day.  Several news sources breathlessly reported that "sources" were "confirming" that Christie had decided against running.  No word on whether these were the same sources who fed the obnoxious and tiresome rumor mill surrounding Christie's intentions for weeks.  You know who my top source on this question was?  Chris Christie, who has said "no" approximately 18,000 times.  Finally, finally, the madness may stop:
 

"For me, the answer was never anything but no...people sent me to Trenton to get a job done & I'm just not prepared to walk away...in the end, what I always felt was the right decision remains the right decision today.  Now is not my time. New Jersey, whether you like it or not, you're stuck with me."


Christie possesses the communications skills and leadership qualities to be an effective chief executive.  Guess what?  He's putting those gifts to great use in carrying out the duties of the chief executive position to which he was elected in 2009.  He's accomplishing big things in New Jersey, and his constituents appreciate his efforts.  Christie has said over and over again that he's not running for president next year.  Some of us actually believed him.  (We're crazy like that).  Others seemed determined to will their preferred scenario into existence.  Today's announcement comes as an anti-surprise for the former group, and a disappointment to the latter one.  Can we please leave this man alone now?  Please?

Proposed cable news discussion topic: How does Christie's announcement that he's not running impact his rumored 2012 presidential bid?  Sigh.


UPDATE - Video added:



UPDATE II - He coulda been a contender:
 

If New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie had entered the race for the Republican presidential nomination, he would have been tied for the lead with former Massachusetts Gov. Mitt Romney -- and he would have run slightly ahead of President Obama among all voters, in Quinnipiac University polling that concluded Monday evening.

Christie and Romney ran even atop the GOP field, tied at 17 percent. Businessman Herman Cain was third, with 12 percent. Texas Gov. Rick Perry, who led the previous Quinnipiac poll, conducted in late August, was at 10 percent. Former Alaska Gov. Sarah Palin was at seven percent, tied with former House Speaker Newt Gingrich, and Rep. Ron Paul, R-Texas, was at six percent.  In a general election matchup against President Obama, Christie led, 45 percent to 42 percent. Among independent voters, Christie led, 45 percent to 37 percent.


Guy Benson

Guy Benson is Townhall.com's Senior Political Editor. Follow him on Twitter @guypbenson.

Author Photo credit: Jensen Sutta Photography