Erika Johnsen

The Christmas season inevitably highlights the divide between Americans who proudly and joyously salute others with "Merry Christmas!" in the month of December, and those who prefer the more politically correct, inclusive, and secular "Happy Holidays!" According to a Marist/Knights of Columbus poll, most Americans generally still prefer the traditional "Merry Christmas!", but there are some very telling regional and demographic differences:

A new poll from Marist and the Knights of Columbus shows that nationwide, two-thirds of Americans prefer to go with "Merry Christmas" over "Happy Holidays." There is a divide, however, between Americans living on the East and West Coasts, and Midwesterners and people living the South.

Fifty-six percent of Northeasterners and 57% of West Coasters said "Merry Christmas" was their greeting of choice. In the Midwest, 70% chose "Merry Christmas," and in the South 69% felt the same.

Older generations were also more likely to choose "Merry Christmas," while 50% of millennials (people ages 18-30) preferred to make merry with "Happy Holidays."

Americans over 65 overwhelming chose "Merry Christmas" over "Happy Holidays," 74% to 22%.


Erika Johnsen

Erika Johnsen is a Web Editor for Townhall.com and Townhall Magazine. Follow her on Twitter @erikajohnsen.