Elisabeth Meinecke

The Obama administration just released a 'supplemental consolidated report' that they've sent to the Speaker of the House and the President Pro Tempore of the Senate designed "to keep the Congress informed about deployments of U.S. Armed Forces equipped for combat" and to remain consistent with the War Powers Resolution, a topic Obama is currently being sued over by a select group of congressmen who say he is in violation of the act.

The letter addresses the U.S. military situation in counterterrorism areas, Iraq, Egypt, Kosovo, maritime operations...and Libya.

Any objective to finally be found here in the Libya section? One sentence reads the troops were deployed "to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe and address the threat posed to international peace and security by the crisis in Libya and to protect the people of Libya from the Qadhafi regime."

"As I reported on March 21, and at my direction, consistent with a request from the Arab League, and as authorized by the
United Nations Security Council under the provisions of U.N. Security Council Resolutions 1970 and 1973, U.S. military forces commenced operations on March 19, 2011, to prevent a humanitarian catastrophe and address the threat posed to international peace and security by the crisis in Libya and to protect the people of Libya from the Qadhafi regime. The initial phase of U.S. military involvement in Libya was conducted under the command of the U.S. Africa Command. By April 4, however, the United States had transferred responsibility for the military operations in Libya to NATO and the U.S. involvement has assumed a supporting role in the coalition's efforts. Since April 4, U.S. participation has consisted of: (1) non-kinetic support to the NATO-led operation, including intelligence, logistical support, and search and rescue assistance; (2) aircraft that have assisted in the suppression and destruction of air defenses in support of the no-fly zone; and (3) since April 23, precision strikes by unmanned aerial vehicles against a limited set of clearly defined targets in support of the NATO-led coalition's efforts. Although we are no longer in the lead, U.S. support for the NATO-based coalition remains crucial to assuring the success of international efforts to protect civilians and civilian populated areas from the actions of the Qadhafi regime, and to address the threat to international peace and security posed by the crisis in Libya. With the exception of operations to rescue the crew of a U.S. aircraft on March 21, 2011, the United States has deployed no ground forces to Libya."

 


Elisabeth Meinecke

Elisabeth Meinecke is TOWNHALL MAGAZINE Managing Editor. Follow her on Twitter @lismeinecke.