Terry Jeffrey
The most ominous trend in America's employment data is not the number of people who have left the labor force, but the number who are now working either for the government or in the as-yet-still-private sector of the health care industry.

Health care has boomed under Obama, according to data published by the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

When Obama was inaugurated in January 2009, there were 13,436,700 jobs in the private health care industry; by this March, there were 14,516,600.

Over the past four years, America has created 1,079,900 new jobs in the private-sector health care industry.

During the same period, total non-farm jobs have grown from 133,631,000 to 135,195,000 -- an increase of 1,564,000.

The 1,079,900 new jobs that the health care industry has created over the past four years equals 69 percent of the 1,564,000 non-farm jobs created during the Obama presidency.

In addition to the 14,516,600 jobs in the health care industry in March, there were also 21,865,000 jobs in government, according to BLS. That means that private health care and government combined to provide 36,381,600 jobs in March.

Those 36,381,600 health care and government jobs equaled 26.9 percent of the non-farm jobs in the United States.

In truth, health care and government have been increasing their dominance in the American job market for years.

Back in January 1990, there were 8,012,300 jobs in health care and 18,151,000 jobs in government for a combined 26,163,300 health care and government jobs. In that year, health care and government jobs made up about 23.9 percent of the 109,145,000 non-farm jobs in the country.

In January 2008, there were 13,138,200 jobs in health care and 22,388,000 jobs in government for a combined 35,526,200 health care and government jobs. In that year, health care and government jobs made up about 25.7 percent of 138,056,000 non-farm jobs in the country.

The welfare state is the key force driving this tandem rise of government and health care.

In 1995, according to the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, 37.6 million people were enrolled in Medicare and 43.3 million were enrolled in Medicaid (for at least one month of the year). In 2012, 50.7 million were enrolled in Medicare and 71.7 million were enrolled in Medicaid (for at least one month of the year).

In 17 years, Medicaid enrollment jumped more than 65 percent.

Why is this so ominous? Because the government has not yet fully implemented Obamacare.


Terry Jeffrey

Terence P. Jeffrey is the editor-in-chief of CNSNews

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