Rich Galen
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At about 2 PM Eastern yesterday, Fred Thompson made it official when he had the campaign press shop issue the following statement:

"Today I have withdrawn my candidacy for President of the United States. I hope that my country and my party have benefited from our having made this effort. Jeri and I will always be grateful for the encouragement and friendship of so many wonderful people."

Like the campaign itself, the statement was brief, unambiguous, and dignified.

At the time, I was having lunch Christine Byun. the ABC producer who had followed the Thompson campaign from the beginning. Our Blackberries began to wheeze and buzz at the same time with the news of the statement and we swung back into full work mode immediately: She calling her desk for instructions, me answering calls from reporters demanding to know why I hadn't told them in advance.

The answer was: I didn't know in advance. Fred Thompson is a private man who makes decisions on his own schedule. Following Saturday's third place finish in South Carolina, I was beset by calls about what he would do and when he would do it.

I had the same answer for all: You have a deadline to report his decision. He has no deadline on which to make it.

The next question I got was: Who will he endorse and when will he do it?

Same answer.

Thompson never got more than 16 percent of the votes in any of the primaries or caucuses, so his endorsement would not seem to be crucial to any of the remaining candidates. Nevertheless, two of them were gracious in their comments.

According to Associated Press reporters Dave Espo and Liz Sidoti, John McCain said:

"Fred Thompson ran an honorable campaign. He and I will remain close friends, and I wish him and his family the best."

Mitt Romney responded to the news of Thompson's exit:

"Throughout this campaign, Fred Thompson brought a laudable focus to the challenges confronting our country and the solutions necessary to meet them. "He stood for strong conservative ideas and believed strongly in the need to keep our conservative coalition together."

Mike Huckabee, on the other hand, whined that Thompson should have gotten out of the race before South Carolina because "the votes that he took essentially were votes that I would have most likely had."

On NPR's "All Things Considered" yesterday when I was asked about that I mis-quoted Shakespeare: The fault, dear Brutus, lies not in our stars, or our opponents, but in ourselves.

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Rich Galen

Rich Galen has been a press secretary to Dan Quayle and Newt Gingrich. Rich Galen currently works as a journalist and writes at Mullings.com.