Mona Charen
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"If you want peace, prepare for war." --Ancient Roman wisdom

In 1938, British Prime Minister Neville Chamberlain was determined to keep peace between Great Britain and Germany. Dismayed by the carnage of World War I, Chamberlain (along with most of the opinion elite in England) sought peace with honor -- but in any case, peace.

Yes, Chamberlain had watched with growing anxiety as Germany, in defiance of treaties, rearmed, and as the Nazi party engaged in ever more brazen and violent repression of domestic opponents. Germany's alliance with militarist Japan and fascist Spain (1936), followed by the Pact of Steel with fascist Italy and the absorption of Austria in early 1938, increased Downing Street's disquiet. Yet Chamberlain was determined that Hitler should comprehend Britain's peaceful intentions.

Chamberlain pursued back-channel negotiations with Hitler throughout 1938, as the Fuhrer fulminated about repression of ethnic Germans in the Sudetenland portion of Czechoslovakia. Hitler's aggressive intent was plain. But Britons, Chamberlain said, were not willing to risk war for "a quarrel in a far away country between people of whom we know nothing." Britain pressured the Czech government to make concessions to Germany. When Hitler increased his threats, Chamberlain implemented "Plan Z" -- an offer to travel to Germany in person to negotiate with Hitler.

Hitler agreed, and Chamberlain met the dictator at his mountain retreat of Berchtesgaden. A week later, he returned to Germany for a second meeting. This time, Hitler kept his eager visitor waiting for half a day, and then backed away from the agreement he had made the previous week. Still, Hitler hinted that if the Sudetenland was handed over, he would have no other territorial claims in Europe. Chamberlain was excited by this, but upon his return home, he found that his cabinet was less so. Undaunted, he contacted Hitler a third time and requested an invitation to return to Germany.

At Munich, after laborious negotiations among many parties including the Czechs, French and Italians, Chamberlain asked for a private meeting with Hitler. At a tete a tete, Chamberlain pulled from his pocket a three-paragraph codicil to the Munich agreement, declaring that Britain and Germany would never go to war again. Hitler signed it happily. And Chamberlain returned home declaring that he had achieved "peace in our time."

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Mona Charen

Mona Charen is a syndicated columnist, political analyst and author of Do-Gooders: How Liberals Hurt Those They Claim to Help .
 
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