Marybeth Hicks

When it comes to 21st-century environmental and energy debates, a little knowledge is a dangerous thing. Especially when what little knowledge you may have is incorrect. And most especially when could be a lie.

That’s the conclusion of documentary filmmakers Ann McElhinney and Phelim McAleer, who are on a quest to shed some light - and truth - on the subject of hydraulic fracturing, or fracking. They are producing a feature-length film called “Frack Nation” that looks at the process of fracking in an effort to combat the “scaremongering” surrounding this safe and useful method of energy production.

If all you have is a little knowledge about fracking, you may believe this method of extracting natural gas from the ground causes environmental and health risks, and therefore should be banned. In fact, you would be unlikely to come to any other conclusion since 2010 when the movie “Gasland” was released, in which producer Josh Fox portrayed fracking as an evil and dangerous practice.

But like much of the environmentalist propaganda that passes for hard science, it turns out Fox’s conclusions about the dangers and impact of fracking are misleading. McElhinney says “Gasland” was misrepresentative, and plans to investigate the health claims surrounding the process to reveal the startling lack of scientific evidence to substantiate them.

“Frack Nation” also will tell the human story of hope and opportunity for people in hard-hit regions of the nation whose lives can be transformed by the ability to use fracking to produce natural gas. Areas such as upstate New York, western Pennsylvania and North Dakota could be promising sources of natural gas if landowners can use fracking to tap reserves deep under the ground.

“It is incredibly important that we tell this story and we tell this story right,” Ms. McElhinney said. “It is disheartening to meet people in upstate New York - farmers who are not able to hang on to the family farm - because of elites who want to take away an extraordinary opportunity for people living in counties where the average salary is less than $20,000 per year. How dare they?”

Because of “Gasland” and the hype about the supposed dangers of fracking, Ms. McElhinney said, state and local environmental policies are hindering landowners’ abilities to tap the energy resources under their properties, eliminating the economic benefits for individuals and families and impeding domestic energy growth.

The filmmakers of “Frack Nation” say the issue isn’t about just energy or the environment, but about personal freedom.


Marybeth Hicks

Marybeth Hicks is the author of Don't Let the Kids Drink the Kool-Aid: Confronting the Left's Assault on Our Families, Faith, and Freedom (Regnery Publishers, 2011).