Maggie Gallagher

Treasury Secretary Henry Paulson looks like an investment banker. He's a big guy, whose large hands, broad shoulders and balding head signal he's got the drive, the cojones, to be an alpha male in the once-intensely competitive world of big money. The owlishly round glasses suggest intellect, and overall, his combination of physicality and IQ remind one of the way Wall Street had become a kind of Roman Circus of nerd gladiators, transforming surging aggression into extraordinary material abundance.

Until lately.

Something else is increasingly obvious about Paulson: He doesn't have a clue.

Remember when he went before Congress and asked for a "really big number" to throw at the credit crisis? Neither Republicans nor Democrats wanted to be the ones to take the hit for Americans' plunging portfolios and accelerating sense of economic crisis. Maybe both parties had a lingering sense of responsibility, of the need to rise above partisanship to "do the right thing." So they gave to this man the power to pass our money around like popcorn or peanuts. And the stock markets plunged anyway.

Paulson has already abandoned the plan he laid out before Congress of using $700 billion of our money to buy out bad mortgage debt. His new idea is to buy bank stocks to inject more money into the system.

General Motors once had a plan too: sell enough good cars to make a profit. General Motors' new plan is to use taxpayer dollars to keep the management team that sent GM to brink of bankruptcy firmly in control.

Bankruptcy of a big company is not the horrible thing it once was for the economy. Under Chapter 11, the courts supervise a new management team and restructure debt in a way that keeps the key wealth-producing asset -- a working corporation -- intact. That way creditors get paid and workers have jobs.

Avoiding bankruptcy is a way for the GM management team to keep their jobs and for labor unions to get taxpayer dollars to avoid facing economic realities, too. And, of course, this is just the beginning. Why automakers and not airlines? Why airlines and not appliances? More companies in trouble will be lining up with grave public arguments about how much better off we all will be when our money is in their pockets.


Maggie Gallagher

Maggie Gallagher is a nationally syndicated columnist, a leading voice in the new marriage movement and co-author of The Case for Marriage: Why Married People Are Happier, Healthier, and Better Off Financially.