Larry Kudlow

Co-Authored by Stephen Moore

John F. Kennedy campaigned for president in 1960 by belittling Dwight Eisenhower's three recessions and declaring, "We can do bettah." He was right. In the 1960s, after the Kennedy tax cuts were implemented, prosperity returned, the economy grew by almost 4 percent annually, unemployment sank to record lows, and a gold-linked dollar held down inflation.

But today many leading economists are throwing up their arms in frustration and assuring us that 2 percent growth is really the best we can do.

Barack Obama's former chief economist Larry Summers began this chant of "secular stagnation." It's a pessimistic message, and it's now being echoed by Federal Reserve vice chair Stanley Fischer. He agrees with Summers that slow growth in "labor supply, capital investment, and productivity" is the new normal that's "holding down growth." Summers also believes that negative real interest rates aren't negative enough. If Fisher and Fed chair Janet Yellen agree, central bank policy rates will never normalize in our lifetime.

Unfortunately, Americans seem to be buying into this dreary assessment. A new Wall Street Journal poll finds that three out of four Americans think the next generation will be worse off than this generation. So long American Dream.

Larry Kudlow

Lawrence Kudlow is host of CNBC’s “The Kudlow Report,” which airs nightly from 7 p.m. to 8 p.m.