Larry Elder

That the older Boston bombing suspect, Tamerlan Tsarnaev, became a terrorist strikes one as disturbing. That younger brother Dzhokhar also became a terrorist strikes one as frightening.

Adjusting to new country can be trying and stressful. The brothers' parents came to America, only to return to Russia. Tamerlan came at age 16. A widely reported quote attributed to Tamerlan from 2010 says: "I don't have one American friend. I don't understand them." According to his aunt, Tamerlan became a devout Muslim. He reportedly once stood up and shouted down his imam for praising Martin Luther King. One shocked witness recalled Tamerlan yelling, "You cannot mention this guy because he's not a Muslim!"

So teenager Tamerlan found adjusting to America difficult. But how to explain Dzhokhar, who came to America a year earlier than his brother, at the age of 8?

Friends describe Dzhokhar as "Americanized" -- an outgoing, friendly pot-smoker who became a popular captain of his wrestling team, a bright boy who never spoke about religion or Russia and never expressed hostility toward America.

Dzhokhar attended high school at Cambridge Rindge and Latin, a highly regarded school full of prominent alumni, including actors Ben Affleck and Matt Damon, poet e.e. cummings, Nobel Prize-winning physicist Eric Cornell and basketball Hall of Famer Patrick Ewing. Dzhokhar then attended University of Massachusetts, Dartmouth in 2011, where he was a sophomore at the time of the bombings.

What about the "education," especially in the social sciences, that Dzhokhar likely received in high school and college? Did the usual left-wing professors, who dominate in number and influence on nearly all of America's college campuses, teach his courses? Did his instructors stress America's imperfections and teach that racism, sexism and homophobia remain major problems in America, that America is an imperial power that dominates the world, that "Bush lied, people died" on the Iraq War, that Abu Ghraib represents our American "military culture of abuse," which explains why so many foreigners "legitimately hate America," etc.?

How many in-class discussions and dorm bull sessions -- conducted among similarly educated and like-minded students sitting beneath wall posters of Che Guevara -- turned into a chorus of attacks against American "imperialism"?


Larry Elder

Larry Elder is a best-selling author and radio talk-show host. To find out more about Larry Elder, or become an "Elderado," visit www.LarryElder.com.