Ken Connor
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Well, it's finally over. After 18 months of intense political conflict, the American people chose to give President Obama another four years at the helm. Not surprisingly, there is a lot of Monday morning quarterbacking happening within the ranks of the GOP. Some are saying that Mr. Romney was defeated because he allowed his campaign to be hijacked by the "extreme right wing" of the party. Others feel that he didn't do enough to distinguish himself as a clear alternative to the President.

One thing that most Republicans can agree on is that Mitt Romney is a decent man who comported himself with grace and dignity during the campaign. And few would deny that Mr. Romney has the business experience to tackle America's economic challenges. But what about other issues important to conservatives? What were they to make of Romney's flip-flops on key social issues like abortion and gay marriage? Many conservatives had a difficult time embracing the Republican candidate, and while they might have voted for him, they couldn't help but wonder whether he was the real deal or a mere political opportunist.

One thing is certain. Neither Mr. Romney nor the Republican Party ever made the case for the sanctity of life or marriage in this election season. Sure, they mouthed their opposition to abortion and their support for traditional marriage, but they never really made their case to the American people as to why these issues are so critical to the health and prosperity of our nation. All we got when it came to social issues in Campaign 2012 were canned soundbytes from the Republican nominee. Consequently, when candidates like Todd Aiken and Richard Mourdock fumbled the ball with their ham-handed responses in their own campaigns, their remarks took on national significance and were imputed to Romney as the GOP's representative in the presidential contest.

There is actually a case to be made for the sanctity of human life and the protection of unborn children, and it isn't just "because the Bible tells me so." It goes something like this:

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Ken Connor

Ken Connor is Chairman of the Center for a Just Society in Washington, DC.