Kathryn Lopez
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For as long as I can remember, I've always thought about waking up obscenely early the morning after Thanksgiving, to check out the goings-on at the toy or department store. Not because I wanted to shop, but to visit the safari -- it's always struck me as quite the exotic mystery, why anyone would want to walk away from a calm morning with family or friends to fight for a parking spot. Of course, now indelibly imprinted in our brains are news images of packed stores on Thanksgiving night itself.

For as long as I can remember, my friend and colleague Jonah Goldberg has been outraged by Kay Jewelers. "Every kiss begins with Kay," suggests the prostitution of women, in his mind. Diamonds might not be a girl's best friend, but I've never shared his chivalrous outrage. That is until catching one of the more recent Kay commercials, for Jane Seymour's "Open Hearts" collection. A gentleman caller gives a young girl a replica of the necklace he had already given her mother, leaving viewers with the impression that the price of modern love is the mother-daughter bling that "Dr. Quinn, Medicine Woman" can sell you.

In his book "Shiny Objects: Why We Spend Money We Don't Have in Search of Happiness We Can't Buy," James A. Roberts examines this excessive materialism. Roberts asserts: "(M)any Americans lack the ability to imagine any life but one focused on the pursuit of material possessions." Looking at the Black Friday hoopla, it's hard not to agree.

"We work to spend and must work more to feed a never-ending desire for more," Roberts tells me. "The average Baby Boomer heading into retirement has saved an average of $50,000. That's barely enough to get them through the first year, let alone the 20 years most of us will live past retirement."

Even in painful economic times, we do have a lot more than we need. And perhaps it is because of this materialistic cliff that our government faces a fiscal one.

"Given that most Americans would readily admit that money and material possessions are not going to make us happy, why do we continue to act as if they will?" Roberts asks.

"iPhones embody the very essence of the 'Shiny Objects' ethos," Roberts tells me. "They are very expensive and need to be updated constantly to stay abreast of all of the new features and apps being offered. Apple has fully embraced the strategies of planned and perceived obsolescence to keep us spending more than we can afford. It's a classic strategy used in many, if not all, industries as a way to keep bringing consumers back to the cash register."

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Kathryn Lopez

Kathryn Jean Lopez, editor of National Review Online, writes a weekly column of conservative political and social commentary for Newspaper Enterprise Association.