Doug Giles

My wife and I have an acquaintance from Boston we’re unfortunately forced to interface with on an irregular basis who continuously gives me and my family hell about hunting.

Yep, she’s a greenie animal worshipper who thinks a rat is a pig is a dog is a boy. She hates those who hunt animals, but she eats beef, pork, chicken, fish and demands leather interior for her gas guzzling SUVs and, of course, for her wardrobe accessories. Yeah, I know … go figure, right?

Because she cannot budge me an inch into her illogical anti-hunting land of insanity and inconsistencies with her irrational blather, she often lays into my youngest daughter, Regis (who is 19 years old), in person or via Twitter. This acquaintance is especially distressed when Regis posts a picture of an animal she’s just whacked, decrying what Regis did and pestering her to give an apologetic for why she puts the bam to Bambi.

As much as this obnoxious dame annoys me, I’m glad she does this to my huntress because it forces the young lass to sharpen her defense as to why hunters rock and the anti-hunters are a crock when it comes to our magical, necessary and delightful world of hunting.

One thing of note with this hunting naysayer is the utter disarray her personal offspring are in. It’s truly a sad state of affairs. All of them are on psychotropics for something. Two of them also medicate, how shall I say, with more organic, non-FDA approved herbs, as well. Additionally, this woman’s brood consists of some of the rudest humans I have ever met. Her kids have pretty much spent their entire childhoods and teenage years being completely ignored by their parents, shuffled off from sitter to sitter, placed in front of TVs, or given gadgets and crap to make up for the parental lack. It’s a message that’s pretty much consistent with the anti-hunters’ mantra—namely, save the animals and screw the humans.

Which leads me to my bottom line bass note for this pro-hunting screed, which is … the family that hunts together, stays together … and more often than not has its act together. Yep, hunting provides many perks for the predator, the prey and for the planet. One of the predominant perks is the familial advantage hunting has provided not only for my family but also for millions of other tribes from time immemorial.

For instance, American archeologists based in Tanzania have just recently discovered the ancient, yet pristine, remains of two caveman homes that were buried under volcanic ash from a Mount Kilimanjaro eruption three million years ago.


Doug Giles

Doug Giles is the Big Dawg at ClashDaily.com and the Co-Owner of The Safari Cigar Company. Follow him onFacebook and Twitter. And check out his new book, Rise, Kill and Eat: A Theology of Hunting from Genesis to Revelation.