David Limbaugh
If I didn't know better, I might conclude that President Obama is trying to validate my book. His personal attacks on Mitt Romney have been so harsh that Romney called them "beneath the dignity of the presidency."

Not only did I devote several chapters to documenting Obama's practice of bullying and attacking his political opponents but my final chapter, uncannily, details Obama's "War on the Dignity of His Office."

Having presided over 41 straight months of unemployment above 8 percent and possessing no arrows in his economic quiver besides deficit spending and raising taxes, it's not surprising Obama continues to resort to these gutter tactics.

What finally drew Romney's ire was Obama's accusing Romney of committing a felony and then Obama's refusing to apologize. This is simply Chicago Thug Politics 101. President Obama's favorite whipping boy, President George W. Bush, would have never stooped to this level. Even in the face of brutal, scurrilous attacks, Bush refused to diminish the dignity of the office.

In recent days, Obama also provided supplemental material for my chapter detailing his "War on Business" by revealing, yet again, his attitude toward the private sector, entrepreneurship and business. He told a crowd in Roanoke, Va., "If you've got a business -- you didn't build that. Somebody else made that happen."

His apologists will say his remarks were taken out of context, but I'm afraid that's not the case. Though no one can deny Obama's assertion that all successful people have benefited from others -- teachers and other mentors -- the thrust of his remarks was directed at crediting government with having an indispensible role in the success of businesses.

Watch the video. He referred wistfully to the Clinton years as a period of unbridled economic growth -- and he attributed that growth to tax increases on the "wealthy." He said that during those years, "we created a lot of millionaires." We? Created? In other words, government created a lot of millionaires; it wasn't their ingenuity, and it certainly wasn't their "hard work" -- a point he made emphatically clear. The government's infrastructure, its roads and bridges, said Obama, created the climate for businesses to thrive. Oh, boy.

David Limbaugh

David Limbaugh, brother of radio talk-show host Rush Limbaugh, is an expert on law and politics. He recently authored the New York Times best-selling book: "Jesus on Trial: A Lawyer Affirms the Truth of the Gospel."

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