David Harsanyi

/>A few years back, an aerospace executive quipped that every time he flew and was forced to remove his shoes, he was grateful Richard Reid was not known as the Underwear Bomber.

Well, on Christmas Day, while the Underwear Bomber was comfortably nestled in his seat in the air, Transportation Security Administration agents across the nation were confronting thousands of potential security breaches at airline terminals.

"I'm going to have to confiscate that tube of Crest," the agent informs you. "The packaging exceeds the 3-ounce limit on liquids."

Surely, millions of travelers feel safer knowing that their boarding passes will be stamped by an eagle-eyed agent who, with a fleeting look, can distinguish between the wicked and the decent. And who among us is not grateful that all footwear will be subjected to a painstaking examination by our best and brightes


It's simple. The longer the wait, the safer we are.

Washington, too, is on the case. The TSA has spent over $40 billion on aviation security since its inception in 2004. The Department of Homeland Security -- an organization created to allow disparate agencies to work in incompetent concert -- doggedly engages yesteryear's terror threats by rapidly acting to thwart security breaches after the fact.

In the face of Umar Farouk Abdulmutallab's underwear bombing attempt, you can be sure we will ratchet up precautionary measures. Most will be useless. All will be annoying.

Next on the docket might be a quick TSA cupping of the groin before boarding. Or, perhaps, a secondary frisking after the strip-search machine has its way with us.

My hope is that next jihadist doesn't stick something in an unmentionable cavity or utilize a hollowed-out book to hide his explosives, as we may end up with nothing more to read than the airline mall magazine as we sit in anguish.

For the terrorist suspect -- you -- there are helpful clues regarding what is permissible on the TSA's website before heading to the airport hours before your flight.

A passenger may not, for instance, carry "Box Cutters" on a plane. "Axes/Ice Picks"? No. "Meat Cleavers"? No. "Sabers"? No. "Bows and Arrows"? No. How about "Hatchets"? Nope. Thankfully, someone at the TSA took the time to let everyone know that "Realistic Replicas of Explosives" are not permissible carry-on items.

A real explosive, like pentaerythritol tetranitrate, though, is a different story -- although, apparently, it is only permissible if you've traveled to Republic of Yemen a couple of times and your father has alerted U.S. authorities that you may be a jihadist.

David Harsanyi

David Harsanyi is a senior editor at The Federalist and the author of "The People Have Spoken (and They Are Wrong): The Case Against Democracy." Follow him on Twitter @davidharsanyi.