Dan Holler
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Are you excited? Fresh off a two-week recess, Senators return to Washington tomorrow. Awaiting their return is the Leahy-Schumer-Reid gun tax.

President Obama urged Americans to “look at the actual legislation.” We honored the President’s request, and the results are damning. In an effort to cut through the media’s gun-grabbing spin, here are eight things every law-abiding citizen, gun owner, and gun user should know.

1) It’s a tax. The Leahy-Schumer-Reid bill effectively puts a tax on selling, lending, or giving away your firearm. None other than President Obama’s “wingman,” Attorney General Eric Holder, will determine the maximum level of taxation. Heritage explains, “Forcing the individual to pay for the government-mandated service, which is in fact a service to the government [not the individual], is in essence a federal tax on the individual.”

2) Prohibits borrowing of a hunting rifle. Take notice, hunters! As currently drafted, the Leahy-Schumer-Reid bill would criminalize the common act of borrowing a friend’s rifle to go hunting unless you submit to a costly and time-consuming background check. And if you decide to go through the background check to borrow a hunting rifle, you could end up on a national firearm registry.

3) Allows national firearm registry. The loose, ambiguous language in the Leahy-Schumer-Reid bill opens the door to a national firearm registry. The current background check system expressly prohibits the creation of “any system for the registration of firearms, firearm owners, or firearm transactions or dispositions.” Heritage explains, “the loose language could be construed to allow the Department of Justice itself…to keep centralized records of who received what guns and where, by sale or gift from one individual to another.”

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Dan Holler

Dan Holler is the Communications Director for Heritage Action for America. Previously, he held numerous positions at The Heritage Foundation, most recently he was the Senate Relations Deputy. A Maryland native, he is a graduate of Washington College.