Chuck Norris

Combat veteran Kryn Miner, 44, served 11 deployments in seven years. He suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder and a traumatic brain injury after a bomb blast in Afghanistan in 2010 threw him into a wall. It was one of 19 blasts he endured over two decades of service to his country.

On April 29, Kryn died after being shot by his teenage son, who was acting in defense of himself, his mother and his siblings because Kryn had threatened to kill them and pulled out a gun. Prosecutors ruled that it was a justified shooting, absolving the teen from facing charges. It was a tragic ending to a stellar military career. But according to his wife, Amy, it wouldn't have happened if the U.S. government were as eager to care for veterans as it is to deploy them overseas in battle.

The 39-year-old widow explained to The Associated Press: "The truth of the matter is if we can't take care of our veterans we shouldn't be sending them off to war. It doesn't make sense. Because they're coming back and this is the result and it's happening more and more."

Kryn was laid to rest May 2. But other wounded warriors don't have to be if the U.S. government cares for America's best as it cared for them on the battlefields of war.

About 15 percent of veterans who served in Iraq or Afghanistan suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. Though estimates are lower for Gulf War vets, the percentage is even higher for Vietnam War vets.

Despite being stereotyped as a military-related illness, PTSD plagues a broad range of citizens (3.5 percent of U.S. adults) who have been impacted by personal assault or other types of trauma. PTSD can occur at any age, including childhood, according to Johns Hopkins Medicine.

The National Institute of Mental Health defines PTSD as "an anxiety disorder that can develop after exposure to a terrifying event or ordeal in which there was the potential for or actual occurrence of grave physical harm. Traumatic events that may trigger PTSD include violent personal assaults, natural or human-caused disasters, accidents, and military combat. People with PTSD have persistent frightening thoughts and memories of their ordeal, may experience sleep problems, feel detached or numb, or be easily startled."

Speaking of medical military tragedies, who can stomach the latest political farce and cover-up from the Obama administration, the secret record keeping and delays in treatment at veterans hospitals that led to dozens of patients dying while waiting for care?


Chuck Norris

Chuck Norris is a columnist and impossible to kill.