Brent Bozell
The liberal media have spent 12 years feeling sorry for Al Gore. The Man Who Should Have Won in 2000 has had megatons of positive publicity dumped on him, hailing him as the "Goracle." They cheered as leftists honored him with the Nobel Peace Prize and gave an Oscar to his filmed eco-sermon, "An Inconvenient Truth."

So when Gore sold his left-wing cable channel Current TV to Al-Jazeera for $500 million, where were they? Despite the fact that conservatives thought the deal sounded like a ridiculous April Fools' joke, the networks had nearly nothing to say. ABC skipped it entirely. CBS and NBC offered a perfunctory sentence on a couple of newscasts.

These networks might argue this was not an Earth-shattering business event given the puny size of Current's audience, which is true. At about 42,000 viewers during primetime, the nationwide audience could fit inside the Washington Redskins' Fedex Field and still leave the stadium half-empty. It's about one-fiftieth of the audience TLC gets with "Honey Boo Boo." Of about 96 cable channels that are publicly rated by Nielsen, 93 of them have higher ratings than Current. It is a Nothing Network.

But the controversy is not about ratings. It's about one network selling itself to another best known for vicious anti-American propaganda. Al-Jazeera is not buying Current for the potential profits. Surely, they'll shut the old channel down. They want the cable slots to push their poison in American homes.

In 2006, CNN's Frank Sesno interviewed Al-Jazeera talk show host Riz Khan and asked if the terrorist group Hamas should be designated as a terrorist organization. "I'm not one to judge," Khan replied. What about Hezbollah? Khan answered: "Same thing, you know, I'm not going to judge."

There are other signs of disturbing pro-Islamist bias. In the midst of the "Arab Spring" celebrations in Cairo's Tahrir Square on Feb. 11, 2011, some 200 men sexually assaulted CBS correspondent Lara Logan. Al-Jazeera English, which was credited by Hillary Clinton and other liberals for its ubiquitous coverage of the uprising, deliberately ignored the assault on Logan. When they were called out by Washington Post columnist Jonathan Capehart, Al-Jazeera English publicist responded that the network "believes as a general rule" that journalists "are not the story." Capehart then noted that just days before, Al-Jazeera touted a story on how "Domestic and foreign journalists have come under siege amid the turmoil in Egypt."


Brent Bozell

Founder and President of the Media Research Center, Brent Bozell runs the largest media watchdog organization in America.
 
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